The Cancer Immunology Program is composed of 34 investigators (29 Full and 5 Associate members) from 13 Departments. The overall goal of the Program is to understand how immune cells work in physiological and pathological conditions, in order to develop new strategies to harness the power of the immune system to fight cancer, and to understand how unique aspects of lymphocyte biology contribute to oncogenesis.
The specific aims are: 1) To discover mechanisms that lead to malignancies of the immune system and develop targeted therapies that exploit the urtique biology of immune cell malignancies;2) To study the basic mechanisms regulating immune responses and their alteration in tumor-bearing hosts, including aspects of antigen presentation, signaling, effector programs and tolerance;and 3) To develop new immunotherapies for the treatment of cancer and test them in pre-clinical and clinical studies. To achieve these goals, the Program promotes forums for interactions between laboratory scientists and clinicians who share a common interest in Cancer Immunology;provides access to sophisticated technologies that are beyond the reach of individual laboratories;and supports members, particularly junior investigators, with seed money for pilot projects for translational applications in cancer immunology. Drs. Sandra Demaria and Michael Dustin are the Co-Leaders for this Program. Total funding increased from $12,703,949 to $15,514,219 since the last competitive application. Membership has decreased from 38 to 34. Publications for the period total 333, of which 7.5% are intra-programmatic, 20.1% are inter-programmatic, and 5.4% are both intra- and inter-programmatic collaborations

Public Health Relevance

Improved understanding of the intricate functioning of the immune system is essential for achieving progress in cancer treatment. This program provides the vehicle for cooperation between investigators with multidisciplinary expertise that is essential for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies exploiting the power of the immune system.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
2P30CA016087-33
Application #
8436427
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
2013-03-01
Project End
2018-02-28
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-02-28
Support Year
33
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$19,456
Indirect Cost
$7,978
Name
New York University
Department
Type
DUNS #
121911077
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10016
Jin, Honglei; Yu, Yonghui; Hu, Young et al. (2015) Divergent behaviors and underlying mechanisms of cell migration and invasion in non-metastatic T24 and its metastatic derivative T24T bladder cancer cell lines. Oncotarget 6:522-36
Zhou, Sherry; Weitzman, Michael; Vilcassim, Ruzmyn et al. (2015) Air quality in New York City hookah bars. Tob Control 24:e193-8
Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max (2015) 10th NTES Conference: Nickel and arsenic compounds alter the epigenome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. J Trace Elem Med Biol 31:209-13
Cohen, Mitchell D; Vaughan, Joshua M; Garrett, Brittany et al. (2015) Acute high-level exposure to WTC particles alters expression of genes associated with oxidative stress and immune function in the lung. J Immunotoxicol 12:140-53
Jhaveri, Komal; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Lake, Diana et al. (2014) A phase II open-label study of ganetespib, a novel heat shock protein 90 inhibitor for patients with metastatic breast cancer. Clin Breast Cancer 14:154-60
Ota, Mitsuhiko; Horiguchi, Masahito; Fang, Victoria et al. (2014) Genetic suppression of inflammation blocks the tumor-promoting effects of TGF-? in gastric tissue. Cancer Res 74:2642-51
McKinney, Caleb; Zavadil, Jiri; Bianco, Christopher et al. (2014) Global reprogramming of the cellular translational landscape facilitates cytomegalovirus replication. Cell Rep 6:9-17
Vazquez-Cintron, Edwin J; Vakulenko, Maksim; Band, Philip A et al. (2014) Atoxic derivative of botulinum neurotoxin A as a prototype molecular vehicle for targeted delivery to the neuronal cytoplasm. PLoS One 9:e85517
Rao, Raghavendra; Graffeo, Christopher S; Gulati, Rishabh et al. (2014) Interleukin 17-producing ??T cells promote hepatic regeneration in mice. Gastroenterology 147:473-84.e2
Wu, Meng; Yang, Feikun; Ren, Zhihua et al. (2014) Identification of the nuclear localization signal of SALL4B, a stem cell transcription factor. Cell Cycle 13:1456-62

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