The long-term mission of the Genome Technology Center (GTC) is to enable and foster institutional science by providing advanced expertise in genomics, centralized state-of-the-art resources, and the training necessary to promote cutting-edge basic, clinical and translational cancer research through dedicated collaborative effort. GTC provides a modern environment that facilitates cross-talk between researchers from diverse fields such as biology, development, clinical research, chemistry and bioinformatics. GTC maintains and provides affordable access to technologically advanced instrumentation including multiple platforms for massively parallel sequencing and microarray profiling, and it creates an educational environment to instruct faculty, staff, fellows, and students on how these technologies can positively advance their research, prepare successful grant applications and publish highly competitive results. GTC also directly assists investigators with the presentation and successful publication of their data. To achieve the specific aims and all aspects of the investigator's cancer-oriented projects, GTC frequently and actively collaborates with additional NYUCI shared resources including the BioRepository Center, Experimental Pathology and the Biomedical Informatics Shared Resource.

Public Health Relevance

The relevance of the Genome Technology Center to the public health lies in its significant contribution to general understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying human malignancies and to the future development of successful therapeutic approaches against human cancers. To that end, the GTC assists over 120 NYULMC laboratories to advance their basic, clinical and translational research.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
2P30CA016087-33
Application #
8436445
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
2013-03-01
Project End
2018-02-28
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-02-28
Support Year
33
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$127,741
Indirect Cost
$52,378
Name
New York University
Department
Type
DUNS #
121911077
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10016
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