Senior Leadership are individuals with the requisite skill sets that in their totality, provide a balanced and complete perspective on our Cancer Center to ensure its optimal growth, function, resource utilization, and intra- and inter-programmatic interactions. These individuals also represent relevant aspects of Cancer Center affairs to the various clinical and research entities that comprise our matrix environment to ensure that the Cancer Center interacts to best advantage and can best capitalize on available external resources. Leadership includes the Cancer Center Executive Director (Dr. Curiel) and Deputy Director (Dr. Giles), our three scientific Associate Directors, Dr. Slaga (Basic and Translational Research), Dr. Naylor (Shared Resources and Internal Education) and Dr. Pollock (Cancer Prevention and Control). Dr. Ramirez serves as Senior Leadership owing to her directorship of the Institute for Health Promotion Research, which serves a critical cancer prevention and Hispanic outreach function for our Cancer Center. We also have an interim Associate Director of Administration with greatly augmented authority and a clear Senior Leadership role as requested in the prior review. A national search for a permanent Associate Director of Administration is undenway, with the expectation that the permanent position will be filled by the time of the site visit. The Senior Leadership ensures that our Cancer Center discharges its public trust through appropriate stewardship of NCI, NIH and related, institutional and philanthropic dollars to translate discoveries into practical applications that provide for the clinical and research cancer care needs of San Antonio, South Texas and the nation. All Senior Leadership members sit on the Executive Committee and other important committees that set current Cancer Center agendas, plan for future growth, challenges and opportunities and help set budgets, recruiting pnorities and scientific agendas that meet these various needs. Support is requested for Dr. Curiel (50%), Dr. Giles (5%), Dr. Naylor (10%), Dr. Ramirez (10%), Dr. Slaga (20%), and Ms. McCarroll (50%). Some Senior Leadership also serve as Program Leaders, but generally those duties are co-shared with Senior Leadership in terms of financial support. Thus, most support for the totality'of the efforts of these individuals comes from Senior Leadership, freeing our scare resources in the budget for additional, constructive uses in our Cancer Center.

Public Health Relevance

Senior Leadership provides a balanced and complete perspective on our Cancer Center to ensure its optimal growth, function, resource utilization, and intra- and inter-programmatic interactions. These individuals also represent relevant aspects of Cancer Center affairs to the various clinical and basic science entities that comprise our matrix environment to ensure that the Cancer Center interacts to best advantage and can best capitalize on available external resources. This group ensures the success and vitality of our Cancer Center and keeps us poised to capitalize on opportunities, such as Proposition 15 dollars.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
3P30CA054174-19S6
Application #
8709459
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
2013-08-01
Project End
2014-07-31
Budget Start
2013-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
19
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$75,000
Indirect Cost
$24,833
Name
University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio
Department
Type
DUNS #
800772162
City
San Antonio
State
TX
Country
United States
Zip Code
78229
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