The Proteomics Core was established in 2003 to address the needs of Center members to examine protein expression, interaction, and post-translational modifications as part of the molecular basis of cancer. The characterization of proteins and analysis of patterns of protein expression and modification will play a critical role in diagnosis and treatment of disease. Gene expression profiling can only provide a partial answer to the molecular aspects of cancer, because proteins are the ultimate mediators of gene function. The Proteomics Core provides investigators with expertise, protocols, and instrumentation to support protein and peptide separations, robotic sampling and digestion, as well as protein and peptide mass analysis. Furthermore, via collaboration with Cancer Informatics, we support data systems, software, and bioinformatics tools for data analysis and archiving. The individual services are grouped into modules for the ease of the collaborator; platforms are provided for protein identification, post-translational modification analysis, and quantification. Since the last submission, the Proteomics Core has added several new personnel, including two staff scientists. Several instruments have been added to the Core, including a second LTQ linear ion trap mass spectrometer (Thermo), an LTQ-Orbitrap upgrade (Thermo), a Symphony peptide synthesizer (Protein Technologies), and a ProPrep 11 (Digilatj) robot for automated sample handling, including protein.digestion, clean up, and MALDI spotting. A variety of new services have also been introduced including standard procedures and charges for separations and the implementation of quantitative mass spectrometry methods. Most significantly, the Core has fully implemented the reaction monitoring techniques on the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The Core's educational focus has expanded with the creation of a Clinical Proteomics Training Program, which enables the Core to train underrepresented undergraduate students. The Core requests CCSG Support of $191,446, which is 30% of its operational budget. Over 93% of usage is by Moffitt members and peer-reviewed.

Public Health Relevance

Proteomics is a new and rapidly evolving field that combines aspects of protein chemistry, separation science, mass spectrometry (MS), and bioinformatics. A central resource for Moffitt Cancer Center investigators, it provides expertise in proteomic applications, access to a variety of separations and mass spectrometry instruments, a highly trained collaborative staff, and educational materials and programs.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA076292-15
Application #
8495985
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-02-01
Budget End
2014-01-31
Support Year
15
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$109,284
Indirect Cost
$44,426
Name
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute
Department
Type
DUNS #
139301956
City
Tampa
State
FL
Country
United States
Zip Code
33612
Reed, Damon R; Mascarenhas, Leo; Manning, Kathleen et al. (2016) Pediatric phase I trial of oral sorafenib and topotecan in refractory or recurrent pediatric solid malignancies. Cancer Med 5:294-303
Permuth, Jennifer B; Pirie, Ailith; Ann Chen, Y et al. (2016) Exome genotyping arrays to identify rare and low frequency variants associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk. Hum Mol Genet 25:3600-3612
Weber, Jeffrey; Gibney, Geoffrey; Kudchadkar, Ragini et al. (2016) Phase I/II Study of Metastatic Melanoma Patients Treated with Nivolumab Who Had Progressed after Ipilimumab. Cancer Immunol Res 4:345-53
Schabath, Matthew B; Massion, Pierre P; Thompson, Zachary J et al. (2016) Differences in Patient Outcomes of Prevalence, Interval, and Screen-Detected Lung Cancers in the CT Arm of the National Lung Screening Trial. PLoS One 11:e0159880
Turner, Joel G; Dawson, Jana L; Grant, Steven et al. (2016) Treatment of acquired drug resistance in multiple myeloma by combination therapy with XPO1 and topoisomerase II inhibitors. J Hematol Oncol 9:73
Haake, Scott M; Li, Jiannong; Bai, Yun et al. (2016) Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in Clear Cell and Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma Revealed by Mass Spectrometry-Based Phosphotyrosine Proteomics. Clin Cancer Res :
Jiang, Kun; Neill, Kevin; Cowden, Daniel et al. (2016) Expression of CAS/CSE1L, the Cellular Apoptosis Susceptibility Protein, Correlates With Neoplastic Progression in Barrett's Esophagus. Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol :
Kim, Jae-Young; Welsh, Eric A; Fang, Bin et al. (2016) Phosphoproteomics Reveals MAPK Inhibitors Enhance MET- and EGFR-Driven AKT Signaling in KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer. Mol Cancer Res 14:1019-1029
Extermann, Martine; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Samiian, Laila et al. (2016) Impact of chemotherapy on medium-term physical function and activity of older breast cancer survivors, and associated biomarkers. J Geriatr Oncol :
Schabath, M B; Welsh, E A; Fulp, W J et al. (2016) Differential association of STK11 and TP53 with KRAS mutation-associated gene expression, proliferation and immune surveillance in lung adenocarcinoma. Oncogene 35:3209-16

Showing the most recent 10 out of 974 publications