The Tobacco Control Program (Program) is the focal point for University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) scientists in disciplines ranging from the molecular biology of nicotine addiction through political science. These scientists combine their efforts to eradicate the use of tobacco and tobacco-induced cancer and other diseases worldwide. A strong theme is that science-driven policy and public health interventions are key to ending the tobacco epidemic, as well as biological and clinical science. The role of the tobacco industry has been an important focus. The specific scientific goals are to conduct clinical and laboratory investigations of the mechanisms of nicotine addiction;to further understand the effects of tobacco use and exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke, including genetic studies and investigations of racial and ethnic differences in measures of tobacco exposure and tobacco-related diseases;to develop and test innovative interventions for tobacco users, especially those in high-risk populations, including youth, individuals co-morbid with mental and substance abuse disorders, chronic smokers, and ethnic minorities;to provide estimates of the economic costs of tobacco use to society and the corresponding benefits of tobacco control programs;to conduct research on tobacco related policy and to continue to study the effects of the tobacco industry, both nationally and internationally, on tobacco use;and to better describe populations with high smoking rates, both in this country and internationally. Rather than being distinct areas of work, these investigations often interact with, and benefit from each other, spanning multiple disciplines. The expertise inherent of the Program membership supports the accomplishment of these goals. Tobacco Control Program work is grouped into five themes: (1) studies of nicotine and tobacco effects, metabolism and biomarkers, including second hand smoke;(2) clinical interventions;(3) the economics of tobacco control;(4) the tobacco industry;and (5) descriptive and epidemiological studies. Since the last competitive review of the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center (Center), the productivity of the Program has increased, new faculty have been mentored and added to the roster, and collaboration across disciplines is increasingly evident. The Program has 20% intra-programmatic and 10% inter-programmatic publications.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA082103-16
Application #
8693939
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-06-01
Budget End
2015-05-31
Support Year
16
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$49
Indirect Cost
$19
Name
University of California San Francisco
Department
Type
DUNS #
094878337
City
San Francisco
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94143
Chen, Justin; Weiss, William A (2014) When deletions gain functions: commandeering epigenetic mechanisms. Cancer Cell 26:160-1
Johnson, Brett E; Mazor, Tali; Hong, Chibo et al. (2014) Mutational analysis reveals the origin and therapy-driven evolution of recurrent glioma. Science 343:189-93
Witte, John S; Visscher, Peter M; Wray, Naomi R (2014) The contribution of genetic variants to disease depends on the ruler. Nat Rev Genet 15:765-76
Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M (2014) HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread. PLoS One 9:e88803
Sharma, Vineeta; Witkowski, Andrzej; Witkowska, H Ewa et al. (2014) Aberrant hetero-disulfide bond formation by the hypertriglyceridemia-associated p.Gly185Cys APOA5 variant (rs2075291). Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 34:2254-60
Gustafson, William Clay; Meyerowitz, Justin Gabriel; Nekritz, Erin A et al. (2014) Drugging MYCN through an allosteric transition in Aurora kinase A. Cancer Cell 26:414-27
Gable, Jonathan E; Lee, Gregory M; Jaishankar, Priyadarshini et al. (2014) Broad-spectrum allosteric inhibition of herpesvirus proteases. Biochemistry 53:4648-60
Cope, Leslie M; Fackler, Mary Jo; Lopez-Bujanda, Zoila et al. (2014) Do breast cancer cell lines provide a relevant model of the patient tumor methylome? PLoS One 9:e105545
Bankoti, Jaishree; Apeltsin, Leonard; Hauser, Stephen L et al. (2014) In multiple sclerosis, oligoclonal bands connect to peripheral B-cell responses. Ann Neurol 75:266-76
Ilkanizadeh, Shirin; Lau, Jasmine; Huang, Miller et al. (2014) Glial progenitors as targets for transformation in glioma. Adv Cancer Res 121:1-65

Showing the most recent 10 out of 71 publications