The Clinical Pharmacology Analytical Core (CPAC) assists Indiana University Simon Cancer Center (IUSCC) investigators in support of research projects and scientific goals, CPAC has been in existence since September 2004 and is the only laboratory on campus that provides investigators state-of-the-art technology to quantify small molecules, drugs, and metabolites, to identify compounds based on their mass spectra, and to analyze pharmacokinetic data. Access to state-of-the-art instrumentation for quantification of drugs and metabolites is an invaluable resource for all cancer investigators in the IUSCC. The CPAC develops and performs assays to identify and/or quantify drugs and metabolites from in vitro (including tissue extracts, cell culture and cell extracts) and in vivo studies (including humans or other animals). It also conducts pharmacokinetic analyses that describe drug (or metabolite) concentrations in the body over a period of time, from absorption to excretion, and information on drug exposure. These services ultimately assist investigators in the analysis of their research protocols regarding pharmacokinetics, pharamacodynamics, pharmacogenetics, toxicity, tumor response and identification of appropriate individualized therapies. This technology has allowed IUSCC investigators to make critical pharmacogenetic observations that are already impacting patient care.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
3P30CA082709-14S5
Application #
8727158
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
2014-08-31
Budget Start
2012-09-01
Budget End
2013-08-31
Support Year
14
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$7,137
Indirect Cost
$2,562
Name
Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis
Department
Type
DUNS #
603007902
City
Indianapolis
State
IN
Country
United States
Zip Code
46202
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