The Proteomics Shared Resource offers state-of-the-art, user-friendly mass spectrometry-based resources to support Cancer Center members. In addition to making available facilities and services, the Core enables education, methods development and new applications, all designed to meet the rapidly evolving needs of researchers in cancer research. The Core operates under the direction of Dr. Allis Chien, with oversight by an interdisciplinary faculty advisory committee. It occupies 2200 sq ft of space in a conveniently accessible central campus location, and employs four staff scientists in addition to Dr. Chien. Currently, the core houses six mass spectrometers and associated instrumentation;these include single quad, ion trap, triple quad, and Q-Tof mass spectrometers, as well as 2-D nano-LC systems and nanospray robots. In-house proteomics data processing capabilities include Sequest, Mascot, Scaffold, and MaxQuant. Annual operating costs are approximately $400,000;as an A21-compliant cost center, the facility operates on a cost-recovery basis, with ongoing expenses recovered primarily through user fees. In 2008, the labs of 32 Cancer Center members comprised 52% of the facility's user base, up from 40% in 2007. Future goals include the implementation of new MS instrumentation, expansion of quantitative proteomics services, and enhancement of data processing capabilities.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA124435-08
Application #
8685174
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-06-01
Budget End
2015-05-31
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$76,663
Indirect Cost
$38,623
Name
Stanford University
Department
Type
DUNS #
009214214
City
Stanford
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94305
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