The Hollings Cancer Center (HCC) at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) seeks National Cancer Institute (NCI) designation via the P30 Cancer Center Support Grant mechanism to support its mission to reduce the cancer burden in South Carolina and beyond. As South Carolina's leading academic medical center, MUSC has been charged and supported over the past decade to build clinical, basic, translational and population-based research programs that address the state's significant cancer morbidity and mortality. Through the support of an NCI P20 Planning Grant (2001-2007), the HCC has recruited and organized 97 cancer scientists, representing six MUSC Colleges - Medicine, Pharmacy, Dental Medicine, Nursing, Health Professions and Graduate Studies - into productive and collaborative cancer research programs. These programs are: Lipid Signaling in Cancer, Cancer Genes &Molecular Regulation, Developmental Cancer Therapeutics and Cancer Immunology. A Cancer Prevention &Control program is in development. The HCC has expanded and continues to expand its research facilities and resources to enhance further growth. In 2006, the HCC completed a seven story tower adjacent to its original 85,761 ft[2] building adding more than 116,000 ft2 in research, clinical and administrative space, and MUSC has committed an additional 62,000 ft2 of research space to the HCC in two new buildings starting construction in summer 2008. As part of this P30 application, five shared research resources will be presented: Lipidomics, Flow Cytometry &Cell Sorting, Cell &Molecular Imaging, Biostatistics and Clinical Trials. The HCC has invested $1.6 million since 2004 into enhancing these five essential and critical resources. Given the rapid and ongoing development of research in the programs, the HCC has also invested another $6 million in initiating the development and optimizing the function of seven other shared resources that will greatly impact on HCC's current and future programmatic-based research initiatives. These investments have resulted in a doubling of the HCC's extramural research funding base since 2003, currently $31.2 million with NCI funding representing $12.1million. Accrual to therapeutic clinical trials has quadrupled in the same time period. This application demonstrates that HCC scientists have made significant contributions to the understanding of cancer biology and the development of novel approaches to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer.

Public Health Relevance

The Hollings Cancer Center is a rapidly growing organization that coordinates scientific research to promote interdisciplinary collaborations and translation of research from the bench to bedside, provides outstanding shared research resources, and impacts South Carolina through cancer prevention, patient care and research.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA138313-05
Application #
8456099
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Program Officer
Silkensen, Shannon M
Project Start
2009-04-01
Project End
2014-03-31
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$1,310,169
Indirect Cost
$421,919
Name
Medical University of South Carolina
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
183710748
City
Charleston
State
SC
Country
United States
Zip Code
29425
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