The Molecular Core will provide several critical services to promote research in drug abuse research. First, we provide a wide range of vector design, construction, and expression services to investigators who need to study the function of a given gene product. This includes epitope-tagged vectors to monitor protein trafficking, or to assess protein-protein interactions. We also provide viral transduction vector design and construction for those investigators who are interested in expression of genes in either primary cells or a cell line. We also provide a wide variety of services for those investigators who are interested in studying the regulation of gene expression. This includes assessment of transcription regulation at the level of gene promoter mapping and function, as well as measurement of mRNA expression by a variety of techniques including quantitative RT-PCR, northern blot analysis, and RNase protection analysis. Finally, we provide genotyping services to the Animal Core, a service which is critical for those strains that must be maintained by breeding heterozygous breeding pairs. In summary, our services are extremely helpful to investigators who are either experienced or inexperienced in molecular biology. It is also apparent that our Core has served to promote interactions and build collaborations between investigators with interests in drug abuse research.

Public Health Relevance

The Molecular Core provides a wide variety of services to investigators interested in drug abuse research, and involved in studies at the molecular level. This Core provides necessary genotyping support for the Animal Core. We provide valuable assistance within Temple University, and to the wider scientific community, and the benefits of our services also include the stimulation of collaborative research efforts.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DA013429-14
Application #
8462589
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDA1-EXL-T)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-05-01
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
14
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$191,681
Indirect Cost
$63,893
Name
Temple University
Department
Type
DUNS #
057123192
City
Philadelphia
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
19122
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