The long-term objective of the Human Subject Recruitment Research Core is to provide investigators whose research interests fall within the mission areas of NIDCD with the subjects they need to complete their studies efficiently and cost effectively. Specifically, the proposed Research Core supports the Communication Sciences Participant Pool to provide to investigators at the University of Washington the names of potential subjects (infants to the elderly) with normal and disordered hearing, balance, voice, speech, and language. By making the process of recruiting subjects more efficient for investigators, research productivity is increased. In addition, collaborations among investigators are encouraged because it is easy to identify the studies in which subjects have been tested and to find subjects who are interested in participating in collaborative efforts. Finally, the Communication Sciences Subject Pool encourages investigators who have avoided becoming involved in research on special populations, such as individuals with communication disorders, because of the difficulties involved in subject recruitment, to pursue their interests in this field of research. Specific goals for the proposed grant period include improving electronic access to participant information, implementation of new clinical recruiting procedures, and expansion of efforts in minority recruitment.

Public Health Relevance

Increasing the efficiency and efficacy of research on hearing, communication and balance will help, in the short term, bring new therapies to the bedside. In the long term, better understanding of the basic normal operation of the organs and systems underlying these functions, as well as the processes leading to disorders, is likely to lead to better prevention and treatment of such disorders and to improved human health

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DC004661-15
Application #
8716717
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDC1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-09-01
Budget End
2015-08-31
Support Year
15
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Washington
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
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