The Administrative Core provides leadership, coordination of activities, exchange of information and ideas and common resources for the Research Base of the Center. All mailings, announcements of meetings and programs, correspondence with visitors and seekers, and correspondence with trainees and awardees are done through the Obesity Research Center office. In addition, the Columbia University Faculty Seminar on Appetitive Behavior is coordinated out of this office as are announcements of the research seminars and meetings at the differing sites. During its twenty-nine years of existence, the NYONRC Administrative Core has acquired experience in the administration of a multi-disciplinary, coordinated program designed to provide a wide array of research-related services to cooperating investigators. In particular, the Administrative Core has evolved experience-based policies relating to the setting of priorities for allocation of Core resources and the development of guidelines covering eligibility for Membership and for Pilot/Feasibility grants. In addition, the Administrative Core has developed procedures for formalizing the recording of Internal Advisory Committee and External Advisory Committee meetings, writing progress reports of the Center, disseminating announcements of outside speakers, scheduling Columbia Seminars on Appetitive Behavior, and in maintaining records of subcontracts, P/F awards, purchases, and expenditures. The Administrative Core has dealt successfully and expeditiously with the organizational changes that have occurred through the years, as previously described in the historical overview.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DK026687-34
Application #
8639520
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
34
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
St. Luke's-Roosevelt Institute for Health Sciences
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10019
Hull, H R; Thornton, J; Paley, C et al. (2015) Maternal obesity influences the relationship between location of neonate fat mass and total fat mass. Pediatr Obes 10:245-51
Toro-Ramos, Tatiana; Goodpaster, Bret H; Janumala, Isaiah et al. (2015) Continued loss in visceral and intermuscular adipose tissue in weight-stable women following bariatric surgery. Obesity (Silver Spring) 23:62-9
St-Onge, M-P; Mayrsohn, B; O'Keeffe, M et al. (2014) Impact of medium and long chain triglycerides consumption on appetite and food intake in overweight men. Eur J Clin Nutr 68:1134-40
Shang, Linshan; Hua, Haiqing; Foo, Kylie et al. (2014) *-cell dysfunction due to increased ER stress in a stem cell model of Wolfram syndrome. Diabetes 63:923-33
Li, P; Tiwari, H K; Lin, W-Y et al. (2014) Genetic association analysis of 30 genes related to obesity in a European American population. Int J Obes (Lond) 38:724-9
Ravussin, Yann; Leibel, Rudolph L; Ferrante Jr, Anthony W (2014) A missing link in body weight homeostasis: the catabolic signal of the overfed state. Cell Metab 20:565-72
Huang, Xian; Leduc, Charles; Ravussin, Yann et al. (2014) A differential dielectric affinity glucose sensor. Lab Chip 14:294-301
Censani, Marisa; Conroy, Rushika; Deng, Liyong et al. (2014) Weight loss after bariatric surgery in morbidly obese adolescents with MC4R mutations. Obesity (Silver Spring) 22:225-31
Zhang, Yiying; Zitsman, Jeffrey L; Hou, Jue et al. (2014) Fat cell size and adipokine expression in relation to gender, depot, and metabolic risk factors in morbidly obese adolescents. Obesity (Silver Spring) 22:691-7
Shen, Wei; Velasquez, Gilbert; Chen, Jun et al. (2014) Comparison of the relationship between bone marrow adipose tissue and volumetric bone mineral density in children and adults. J Clin Densitom 17:163-9

Showing the most recent 10 out of 480 publications