Members of the Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease (CGIBD) are basic and clinical scientists from diverse disciplines dedicated to advancing our understanding of the biology, physiology and epidemiology of digestive and liver diseases. The overarching hypothesis that integrates the scientific activities of CGIBD members is that most digestive and hepatic diseases are the result of complex interactions between host genetic susceptibility and environmental stimuli. The theme that links the research of Center members is gene-environment interactions in gastrointestinal and liver disease. The goal of the Center is to promote and enhance multidisciplinary and translational digestive disease research. The Center achieves this goal through: 1) core facilities that provide training, technical assistance, laboratory animals, biostatistical and data management support, assays, imaging, and histology;2) a pilot feasibility program that offers startup funds to junior investigators or to established investigators who wish to pursue a new research direction;3) a scientific enrichment program consisting of seminars, symposia and workshops to improve the intellectual climate for digestive disease research and to promote cooperation, collaboration and communication among involved personnel;4) a professional development and training program that fosters the careers of junior faculty. To support the research of members, the Center proposes an Administrative Core to organize the activities of the Center and the following scientific cores: 1) Biostatistics and Data Management;2) Immunotechnologies 3) Histology and Imaging;and 4) Gnotobiotic Animal. These cores have evolved to support the scientific directions of Center members and new investigative opportunities. The cores improve efficiency, lower cost, and provide services that would not otherwise be available to investigators. Through all of its activities, the Center improves communication, promotes collaboration, develops careers and generally enriches the intellectual climate for digestive disease research.

Public Health Relevance

Gastrointestinal diseases and their complications have a significant health and economic impact. Research by members of this center has led to fundamental breakthroughs in our understanding of mechanisms responsible for inflammatory bowel diseases, growth and repair, liver fibrosis, irritable bowel syndrome, and gastrointestinal cancer.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DK034987-29
Application #
8576453
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1-GRB-8 (M1))
Program Officer
Podskalny, Judith M,
Project Start
1996-12-01
Project End
2014-11-30
Budget Start
2013-12-01
Budget End
2014-11-30
Support Year
29
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$994,461
Indirect Cost
$272,759
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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