The Morphology Core Facility provides instrumentation and technical expertise for the preparation, acquisition and analysis of images of cells and tissues at both the light and electron microscopic level. Given the cost of such instrumentation and the high level of technical expertise required to perform these investigational techniques, this Core was established to ensure the availability of these techniques for Center members. In recognition of the broad usefulness of this Core facility, the School of Medicine has partnered with the Liver Center by making ongoing, major investments to ensure that the facility remains state-of-the-art. The Morphology Core offers the following specific activities and services, plus associated training and technical support: 1) confocal microscopy, 2) epifluorescence microscopy, including quantitative and ratio imaging, 3) multiphoton microscopy, 4) electron microscopy, and 5) time lapse microscopy and image processing and analysis. Over half of the members of the Liver Center used this core facility and the core was used in over one hundred publications during the current award period, reflecting the usefulness and importance of this resource for the mission of the Center.

Public Health Relevance

The primary focus of the Yale Liver Center is the study of liver structure, function and disease. The Morphology Core plays a key role in this endeavor by permitting direct visualization of the structure and function of the liver and its components at the cellular and subcellular level. This resource in turn helps investigators to better understand the function of cells within the liver in normal and disease states.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
2P30DK034989-31
Application #
8739107
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
31
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Yale University
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
New Haven
State
CT
Country
United States
Zip Code
06510
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