The Integrated Translational Research has been created within the last cycle ofthe DDRCC, in 2007, as a centralized service aimed to address the needs of an increasing number of translational investigators in the field of digestive diseases at the University of Chicago. It replaces and expands the Clinical Component of the Administrative core, which was limited to assistance for clinical study design and IRB protocols. The Director, Dr. Bana Jabri, together with the Co-PI, Dr. David Rubin, is responsible for ensuring proper scientific direction and efficient use of services. Three main services will be offered: 1) Assistance to design and perform human studies. This service comprises: a) establishment of an """"""""umbrella"""""""" IRB protocol, and help to obtain specific IRBs;b) assistance to design human studies;c) Personal training to perform phenotypic and translational studies on cell purified from intestinal samples;d) Bank of antibodies directed against common human antigens;and e) help for biostatistical analysis in collaboration with the University of Chicago CTSA. 2) Clinical database. This service comprises: a) Obtaining patient consent for clinical data and blood/ tissue acquisition;b) Implementation of a systematic """"""""first visit"""""""" and """"""""follow-up"""""""" clinical questionnaire for patients with inflammatory bowel disease;and c) implementation and maintenance of a longitudinal clinical Velos? database system. Velos eResearch is a highly-regarded clinical research information system chosen by 20 medical institutions with top 25 ratings in U.S. 3) Tissue banking. We are implementing a LIMS (Lab Infonnation Management System) using the caTissue Suite for sample tracking and management. Furthermore, through a collaboration with TRIDOM project ((Translational Research in the Department of Medicine), DDRCC members will have access to DNA, blood and serum samples. Importantly, for DDRCC investigators with the appropriate IRB, it will be possible to match clinical database information with specific biospecimens. The IT core is a central piece ofthe DDRCC that is tightly linked to all other cores ofthe DDRCC. It provides DDRCC investigator with an infrastructure dedicated to integrated translational research in the field of inflammatory intestinal diseases. Patient databases will be integrated with collection of tissue/ DNA/RNA/protein specimens, genotyping, immunological phenotyping, and molecular profiling of patient bacterial microbiomes. This structure will also serve as an umbrella for the training and education of faculty and fellows in unique aspects of patient-oriented research.

Public Health Relevance

The goal of the integrated translational core is to provide an infrastructure that allows to link patient-oriented research and basic science. Establishing this link is critical to advance our understanding of intestinal inflammatory diseases and identify new therapeutic avenues.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DK042086-23
Application #
8425026
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1-GRB-8)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2012-12-01
Budget End
2013-11-30
Support Year
23
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$173,850
Indirect Cost
$62,408
Name
University of Chicago
Department
Type
DUNS #
005421136
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60637
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