; The Yale Diabetes Research Center (DRC) was established in 1993 with the goal of promoting research in diabetes and related metabolic and endocrine disorders at the University. The DRC brings together a multidisciplinary group of over 100 member and associate member scientists as well as professional supporting staff, new Investigators and research trainees from in 16 departments and 4 colleges or schools at Yale University The scope ofthe research activities ofthe membership is very broad, ranging from basic molecular biology to whole body physiology and the treatment of diabetic patients. The members, however, share a common interest in research that is related to diabetes and metabolism or is fundamental to understanding its pathogenesis or for the development of new treatment strategies. The design of the Yale DRC is aimed at developing an Infrastructure that could serve as a catalyst to stimulate innovative diabetes-related research. The cornerstone of the DRC is its five Research Cores that provide funded basic and clinical investigators with the opportunity to more efficiently utilize resources and expand the scope of their research programs. The Clinical Metabolism and the Diabetes Translational Cores facilitate metabolic research in patients, whereas the Molecular Genetic Mouse Core, Physiology and Cell Biology Cores that comprise the more basic science focus of the Center offer investigators the tools to create and test novel animal models starting from the molecule and ending with biological outcomes. The Administrative Core oversees the operation ofthe Center, Its Pilot/Feasibility Project and Enrichment Programs, and helps to coordinate patient-based research in diabetes. The goals ofthe DRC are to: 1) stimulate multldisciplinary Interactions, particularly between basic and clinical scientists;2) encourage established Investigators not presently working in diabetes-related areas, to bring their expertise to bear on problems relevant to diabetes;3) efficiently organize time consuming and/or costly techniques through Core facilities to enhance the productivity of investigators conducting research in diabetes related areas;4) promote new research programs through pilot feasibility projects;5) enhance the quality of research training, and 6) create a stimulating institutional environment that enhances research efforts by its members to develop new strategies to prevent and treat diabetes and related metabolic disorders at the local and national level.

Public Health Relevance

; The Yale Diabetes Research Center provides the infrastructure to support a wide spectrum clinical and basic scientists who are working collaboratively to understand why diabetes develops, and to translate discoveries from the bench to the bedside and ultimately to new strategies for the prevention and treatment of patients with, or who are at risk for developing diabetes.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DK045735-22
Application #
8635337
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1-GRB-S (O2))
Program Officer
Hyde, James F
Project Start
1997-01-01
Project End
2018-01-31
Budget Start
2014-02-01
Budget End
2015-01-31
Support Year
22
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$1,664,988
Indirect Cost
$664,995
Name
Yale University
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
043207562
City
New Haven
State
CT
Country
United States
Zip Code
06520
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