The goal of the Cell Biology Core is to make available to members of the Yale DRC the instrumentation, technical personnel, and expertise for the analysis of cell function in areas of research related to diabetes. The Core focuses primarily on imaging techniques (both light and electron microscopy), and also offers quantitative infra-red imaging of gels and multiwall plates. Emphasis is given to immunocytochemical methods, and to the dynamic light microscopy imaging of living cells containing fluorescent markers, using standard epifluorescence, total internal reflection, and confocal (including spinning disk) techniques. In addition, the core offers leading edge techniques such as electron microscopy tomography and three different types of super-resolution microscopy (STED, FPALM, and SIM). DRC investigators will be trained in various imaging techniques as required for their work. It is anticipated that the services provided by the Core will permit the elucidation of wide-ranging aspects of cell function that are critical to understanding diabetes pathophysiology.

Public Health Relevance

Diabetes causes significant morbidity and mortality in the U.S. and wortdwide. The Cell Biology Core of the Yale DRC offers investigators the tools required to better understand the pathophysiology of all types of diabetes and their complications. As part of a multi-faceted effort, the advances that will be facilitated by this Core will lead to improved prevention and treatment of these conditions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DK045735-22
Application #
8635341
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1-GRB-S)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-02-01
Budget End
2015-01-31
Support Year
22
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$95,571
Indirect Cost
$38,171
Name
Yale University
Department
Type
DUNS #
043207562
City
New Haven
State
CT
Country
United States
Zip Code
06520
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