The Human Genome Project and the development of the expressed sequence tag (EST) clone collection and database have revolutionized gene expression analysis. Instead of measuring one or a few genes, parallel DNA microarrays are capable of simultaneously measuring expression of thousands of genes, providing a glimpse into the logic and functional grouping of gene programs encoded by our genome. The term functional genomics encompasses varied approaches that provide a more global investigation into the expression and role of groups of genes in a physiologic process than has been previously available. As such, this approach represents a fundamental shift from the traditional 'one gene at a time'approach to the study of basic biological processes. cDNA microarrays and oligonucleotide-based microarray methodologies have the potential to provide a new level of information about cell or tissue function not previously possible. However, these technologies require an investment in expensive equipment and highly trained, experienced technicians. Most laboratories cannot afford to commit the substantial technical resources and personnel to the development and ongoing refinement of these particularly complex experimental methods. It is more cost effective to concentrate this instrumentation and highly skilled technical support in a centrally managed facility, where they will be efficiently utilized and cost effective. The Functional Genomics Core Facility was designed to provide this critical core expertise to the digestive disease research community. The unique feature of the Functional Genomics Core Facility is the expertise it provides to participating investigators on the application of high density comprehensive arrays to study gastrointestinal and hepatic qene expression. In maintaining an independent microarray core, DDRCC research investigators are provided with access to the Agilent platforms at extremely low costs ($275/2 sample comparisons using the 44K gene arrays) and with much more rapid turn around time (<5 days) than other microarray facilities in the institution. The close proximity of the Functional Genomics Core to the DDRCC Morphology Core and the DDRCC Tissue Procurement Facility greatly facilitates the processing and analysis of clinical samples related to digestive disease disorders. The DDRCC Functional Genomics Core works closely with other microarray facilities at this institution that offer alternative commercial platforms, such as the Affymetrix platforms supported by the CTSA sponsored Translational Pathology and Tissue Banking Core, and the Illumina platforms supported by the Genome Sequencing Center of Washington University. Important for tight budgets, the cost of our services is less than half the cost of a single sample Affy array, and is about 20% less than the Illumina platform. Just as important, the Functional Genomics Core provides integrative and bioinformatic services.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
Application #
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1-GRB-8)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
Fiscal Year
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Washington University
Saint Louis
United States
Zip Code
Cavallo, J A; Greco, S C; Liu, J et al. (2015) Remodeling characteristics and biomechanical properties of a crosslinked versus a non-crosslinked porcine dermis scaffolds in a porcine model of ventral hernia repair. Hernia 19:207-18
Röhrig, Theresa; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Ziegler, Ricarda et al. (2015) Toying with fate: Redirecting the differentiation of adrenocortical progenitor cells into gonadal-like tissue. Mol Cell Endocrinol 408:165-77
VanDussen, Kelli L; Marinshaw, Jeffrey M; Shaikh, Nurmohammad et al. (2015) Development of an enhanced human gastrointestinal epithelial culture system to facilitate patient-based assays. Gut 64:911-20
Cavallo, Jaime A; Roma, Andres A; Jasielec, Mateusz S et al. (2014) Remodeling characteristics and collagen distribution in synthetic mesh materials explanted from human subjects after abdominal wall reconstruction: an analysis of remodeling characteristics by patient risk factors and surgical site classifications. Surg Endosc 28:1852-65
Jin, Ramon U; Mills, Jason C (2014) RAB26 coordinates lysosome traffic and mitochondrial localization. J Cell Sci 127:1018-32
Zhou, Yanjiao; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; Hink, Tiffany et al. (2014) Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of Clostridium difficile isolates: a single-center study. J Clin Microbiol 52:4260-6
Craft, Clarissa S; Pietka, Terri A; Schappe, Timothy et al. (2014) The extracellular matrix protein MAGP1 supports thermogenesis and protects against obesity and diabetes through regulation of TGF-?. Diabetes 63:1920-32
Choi, Pamela M; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R et al. (2014) Disruption of retinoblastoma protein expression in the intestinal epithelium impairs lipid absorption. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 306:G909-15
Patel, Amit; Sayuk, Gregory S; Gyawali, C Prakash (2014) Acid-based parameters on pH-impedance testing predict symptom improvement with medical management better than impedance parameters. Am J Gastroenterol 109:836-44
Xie, Yan; Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Newberry, Elizabeth P et al. (2014) Hepatic Mttp deletion reverses gallstone susceptibility in L-Fabp knockout mice. J Lipid Res 55:540-8

Showing the most recent 10 out of 578 publications