The Boston Area Diabetes Endocrinology Research Center (BADERC) is a dynamic consortium of 63 laboratory-based and clinical investigators whose efforts are directed toward addressing many of the major research questions bearing on the etiology, pathogenesis, treatment and cure of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and their associated microvascular and atherosclerotic complications. The center Director (Joseph Avruch and Associates Directors (Joel F. Habener, Jose Florez and Brian Seed) are highly productive investigators of international stature in signal transduction, gene expression, human genetics, molecular biology and immunology, topics central to advances in diabetes research. The participating scientists are based at a large number of Boston-area research institutions, including the major Harvard Medical School-affiliated teaching hospitals (the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Beth Israel-Deaconess Medical Center) and Harvard-affiliated research institutions (the School of Arts and Sciences, School of Public Health, the Schepens Eye Research Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute), the Boston University Medical Center, the New England Medical Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. These investigators are working at the cutting edge of fields most relevant to defining the pathogenesis and optimal treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes: The molecular arid genetic basis of Diabetes, molecular regulation of energy balance and insulin resistance; the biology of the vascular system and pancreatic beta cell; the immunologic basis and optimal therapies for autoimmunity and transplant rejection; the development of new methods for glycemic monitoring and control. The BADERC offers these scientists an array of core support services (Cell Biology/Morphology, Transgenics, Immunology/Flow Cytometry and Metaboljc Physiology, Human Islet preparation and Mouse Enerergetics) that incorporate the latest technical advances in molecular genetics, cell biology, and metabolic physiology provided by acknowledged experts. A program that enables facilitated access for BADERC investigators to several platforms of the Broad institute is ongoing (Genomics, Proteomics, Metabolomics, lentiviral encoded shRNA design and production, Imaging and Chemical screening platforms). Most BADERC cores are heavily oriented towards hands-on training. The BADERC also supports a highly subscribed pilot and feasibility grant program. The easy access to cost effective support services of outstanding quality together with the educational and pilot grants program has promoted many collaborations, and attracted to diabetes research new talent from this outstanding scientific community. Finally, it is a goal of the center to foster the closest interactions between the laboratory based and clinical scientists, so as to ensure the translation of research discoveries into advances in the care of diabetic patients. Total direct costs of the investigator's research base is $93,852,058.

Public Health Relevance

This Diabetes Research center provides high quality, cutting edge and cost effective technical support to investigators performing research related to Diabetes Mellitus. It also provides seed grants for diabetes-related research, a resource that has been avidly sought by area investigators.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DK057521-20
Application #
9702788
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1)
Program Officer
Hyde, James F
Project Start
2000-06-01
Project End
2020-03-31
Budget Start
2019-04-01
Budget End
2020-03-31
Support Year
20
Fiscal Year
2019
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Massachusetts General Hospital
Department
Type
DUNS #
073130411
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02114
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