The Gene and Protein Expression Core, under the leadership of Dr. Steven Potter, provides state-of-the-art services to meet the research needs of the Cincinnati NIDDK-Digestive Disease Research Core Center (DDRCC). The Core has supported digestive disease research in Cincinnati since it became a """"""""mini-center"""""""" in 2003. In 2007, the Center evolved to a full DDRCC and took the name of Cincinnati Digestive Health Center (DHC), with a focus on translational research in pediatric digestive disease. Since then, maintaining full alignment with the Center focus, the Core provided DHC investigators with a broad array of gene expression and sequencing services, with DHC investigators having direct access to its staff for consultation, and their service requests received priority. The services were accurate, reproducible and completed in a timely fashion. In addition to gene expression and sequencing services directly related to studies of cell and tissue function and of disease phenotypes, the Core has been instrumental in technology transfer by holding seminars and workshops that were well subscribed by DHC Members, Associate Members, and research associates. The Core fostered interactions and collaborations among DHC investigators, which resulted in co-authorships of publications with at least two DHC investigators. Interactions with DHC investigators also resulted in increased awareness of research needs, which formed a strong rationale for an evolution of services;they led to the pursuit of new services and new technologies. One example is the development and implementation of next generation sequencing as a powerful technology to study genetics and genomics. More projects using NextGen are in progress by DHC investigators. Another example is the quantification of proteins to validate the steady-state expression of genes and gene groups either by protein multiplexing or by flow cytometry. In all cases, new services were accompanied by training workshops, in close collaboration with the DHC leadership, and without disruption of other services. To reflect the enhanced service portfolio, the Core name changed from """"""""Gene Expression and Sequence Core"""""""" to Gene and Protein Expression Core. Administratively, the Core staff has had formal interaction with the DHC leadership at monthly executive meetings, at the time of submission of usage reports on a quarterly basis, and at the times when the Core held technology transfer workshops organized by the DHC for its investigators. Thus, the Core has been dynamic, collaborative, and engaged in the delivery of services that facilitate digestive disease research.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DK078392-07
Application #
8464069
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1-GRB-8)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-06-01
Budget End
2014-05-31
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$245,628
Indirect Cost
$84,230
Name
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
071284913
City
Cincinnati
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
45229
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