Composite Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death for patients with kidney disease. The causes of this preponderance of cardiovascular disease in patients with kidney disease are not clear. Hypertension is also highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), representing the second most common cause of end-stage renal disease in the US. Elevated blood pressure amplifies cardiovascular risk and promotes progression of CKD irrespective of the primary cause. Since a patient with CKD is more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than to require renal replacement therapy, exaggerated cardiovascular risk is arguably the most pressing clinical problem facing nephrologists and their patients. Accordingly, the major objective of the George M. OBrien Kidney Research Core Center at Duke is to promote and support research into understanding the unique links between the kidney, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension. We recognize that progress in this area will require multi-disciplinary teams of investigators with broad expertise across a range of disciplines in the clinical and basic sciences. To this end, our Center will mobilize unique resources at Duke University Medical Center to bear upon this daunting clinical problem including. Taking advantage of our robust international research base, we will accomplish our objective through the following specific aims: (1) Develop education programs designed to highlight the importance of the interrelationship of kidney and cardiovascular disease, to inform Center investigators of the latest advances in relevant research, and to train investigators in clinical and basic science approaches to advance research. (2) Support pilot and feasibility studies to explore new areas of research relevant to the kidney in cardiovascular diseases serving as a foundation for other external funding. (3) Establish an Animal Models Core to support basic discovery research. (4) Establish a Renal Genetics Core to provide intellectual and technical support for understanding the genetics of kidney and cardiovascular diseases including hypertension. (5) Establish a Clinical/Translational Core to foster and facilitate clinical and translational research on the inter-relationships among CKD, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease.

Public Health Relevance

Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death for patients with kidney disease. High blood pressure is also common, representing the second most common cause of end-stage renal disease in the US. The major objective of our proposal is to promote and support research into understanding the links between the kidney, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
3P30DK096493-03S1
Application #
8912150
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1-GRB-6 (M1))
Program Officer
Kimmel, Paul
Project Start
2012-08-15
Project End
2017-06-30
Budget Start
2014-09-08
Budget End
2015-06-30
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$30,240
Indirect Cost
$2,240
Name
Duke University
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
044387793
City
Durham
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27705
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