INTEGRATED HEALTH SCIENCES FACILITY CORE The specific objectives of the Integrated Health Sciences Facility Core (IHSFC) are to: 1) Provide the services, instrumentation and technologies needed for basic and applied environmental health research, including population-scale genomics, cell and molecular analytics, and environmental exposures and chemistry;2) Support translational research to improve exposure characterization, early detection of disease risk, biomarker discovery and development of preventive interventions for environmentally related diseases;3) Provide training in methods and technologies to present and future environmental health scientists. To achieve these goals, the IHSFC consists of the Bioanalysis, Environmental Genomics, Particles, Metals, and Organics Services. Each service provides: 1) scientific expertise and advice to Center investigators on how to best accomplish their goals;2) in-house instrumentation, exposure chambers, and technical staff for biological and environmental studies;3) access to an extraordinary menu of other analytical services in the Harvard Medical area, the Harvard-Cambridge campus, and beyond. The IHSFC supports the translational mission of the Center by the analyses performed, by maximizing efficient use of small samples from subjects in population studies, and by assisting investigators in communicating results to community groups and policymakers. Each IHSFC service also trains students, post-docs and other environmental scientists in the technologies offered. The overall benefit to the NIEHS Center is expertise and provision of analyses, assistance with translation of research and the training and development of future environmental health scientists.

Public Health Relevance

INTEGRATED HEALTH SCIENCES FACILITY CORE NARRATIVE The Integrated Health Sciences Facility Core (IHSFC) provides access to the services, instrumentation and technologies needed for basic and applied environmental health research, including population-scale genomics, cell and molecular analytics, and environmental exposures and chemistry. The IHSFC supports the translational mission of the Center directly by the analyses performed, and also indirectly by maximizing efficient use of small samples from human subjects in population studies, making it easier for the subjects and thereby making it easier to conduct the studies of human environmental health effects. Each IHSFC service also trains students, post-docs and other environmental scientists in the technologies offered, and helps provide materials for the communication of results to community groups and policy makers.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
2P30ES000002-51
Application #
8619188
Study Section
Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee (EHS)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-05-09
Budget End
2015-03-31
Support Year
51
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$541,853
Indirect Cost
$206,340
Name
Harvard University
Department
Type
DUNS #
149617367
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02115
Raz, Raanan; Weisskopf, Marc G; Davidovitch, Michael et al. (2015) Differences in autism spectrum disorders incidence by sub-populations in Israel 1992-2009: a total population study. J Autism Dev Disord 45:1062-9
Bollati, Valentina; Angelici, Laura; Rizzo, Giovanna et al. (2015) Microvesicle-associated microRNA expression is altered upon particulate matter exposure in healthy workers and in A549 cells. J Appl Toxicol 35:59-67
Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Suh, Helen H et al. (2014) Short-term effects of air pollution on oxygen saturation in a cohort of senior adults in Steubenville, Ohio. J Occup Environ Med 56:149-54
Mathews, Joel A; Williams, Alison S; Brand, Jeffrey D et al. (2014) ?? T cells are required for pulmonary IL-17A expression after ozone exposure in mice: role of TNF?. PLoS One 9:e97707
Ma, Baoshan; Wilker, Elissa H; Willis-Owen, Saffron A G et al. (2014) Predicting DNA methylation level across human tissues. Nucleic Acids Res 42:3515-28
Wilker, Elissa H; Ljungman, Petter L; Rice, Mary B et al. (2014) Relation of long-term exposure to air pollution to brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and reactive hyperemia. Am J Cardiol 113:2057-63
Kasahara, David I; Kim, Hye Y; Mathews, Joel A et al. (2014) Pivotal role of IL-6 in the hyperinflammatory responses to subacute ozone in adiponectin-deficient mice. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 306:L508-20
Wong, Jason Y Y; De Vivo, Immaculata; Lin, Xihong et al. (2014) The association between global DNA methylation and telomere length in a longitudinal study of boilermakers. Genet Epidemiol 38:254-64
Neophytou, Andreas M; Hart, Jaime E; Chang, Yan et al. (2014) Short-term traffic related exposures and biomarkers of nitro-PAH exposure and oxidative DNA damage. Toxics 2:377-390
Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu Mathilda; Coull, Brent A; Sternthal, Michelle J et al. (2014) Effects of prenatal community violence and ambient air pollution on childhood wheeze in an urban population. J Allergy Clin Immunol 133:713-22.e4

Showing the most recent 10 out of 381 publications