The mission of the Center for Environmental Exposure and Disease (CEED) is to improve human health by performing trans-disciplinary research to elucidate how the total environment, the genome and the epigenome interact to mitigate the risk of disease. CEED research focuses on: 1) assessing and modeling exposures, 2) discovering and applying biological response indicators which link exposures to mechanisms of pathogenesis, 3) developing and implementing targeted prevention, intervention, and treatment strategies, 4) reducing exposures by influencing public policy, planning and regulation, and 5) engaging and informing stakeholders. By analogy with Precision Medicine, CEED envisions that the integration of data from exposure biology, genomics, epigenetics and microbiomics to assess exposures, biological responses, mechanisms of pathogenesis and disease prevention will significantly impact the future of environmental health. The CEED vision is to lead the development of precision environmental health research through the integration of clinical, basic, and population-based studies, using the acquired information to prevent and/or treat environmental disease. The strategy is to combine the Center's long-standing breadth and depth of expertise in environmental health research with new capabilities in exposure biology, epigenomics, and microbiomics.
The specific aims are:
Aim 1 : Move basic, clinical and population research toward precision environmental health by: i) fostering a collaborative, transdisciplinary research environment, ii) supporting innovative research and emerging science through pilot grant funding, and iii) providing cost-effective access to Facility Cores that maintain state-of-the-art technologies and expertise.
Aim 2 : Provide training and mentoring opportunities to junior investigators and established researchers in innovative and emerging environmental health research through: i) mentoring committees and a structured mentoring curriculum, ii) collaborative research, iii) Career Development Awards and Pilot Project grants, and iv) opportunities for expanded training with other NIEHS Centers.
Aim 3 : Strengthen and expand existing relationships with community partners by: i) facilitating bidirectional interactions among CEED researchers and community partners to identify environmental concerns and desired outcomes, ii) developing research programs that address community health needs, and iii) providing research results, educational materials and expertise to communities and health professionals, enabling them to minimize exposures and influence public health policy.
Aim 4 : Translate research findings to stakeholders in local, state and federal government agencies to provide guidance on mitigation of risk, to influence public policy, and to support legislation that reduces exposure and improve environmental health.

Public Health Relevance

The mission of the CEED is to improve human health by performing transdisciplinary research to elucidate how the total environment interacts with host factors to mitigate the risk of disease. To accomplish the mission, CEED researchers focuses on: 1) assessing and modeling exposures;2) discovering and applying biological response indicators which link exposures to mechanisms of pathogenesis;3) developing and implementing targeted prevention, intervention, and treatment strategies;4) reducing exposures by influencing public policy, planning and regulation;and 5) engaging and informing stakeholders. CEED envisions that the integration of data from exposure biology, genomics, epigenetics and microbiomics to assess exposures, biological responses, mechanisms of pathogenesis and disease prevention, will significantly impact the future of environmental health. INSTITUTIONAL COMMITMENT AND ORGANIZATION

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
2P30ES005022-27
Application #
8622099
Study Section
Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee (EHS)
Program Officer
Thompson, Claudia L
Project Start
1997-04-01
Project End
2019-03-31
Budget Start
2014-07-29
Budget End
2015-03-31
Support Year
27
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$1,749,000
Indirect Cost
$649,000
Name
Rbhs-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
Department
Public Health & Prev Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
078795875
City
Piscataway
State
NJ
Country
United States
Zip Code
08854
Ball, Nicholas; Cronin, Mark T D; Shen, Jie et al. (2016) Toward Good Read-Across Practice (GRAP) guidance. ALTEX 33:149-66
Lioy, Paul J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Georgopoulos, Panos G (2016) Preparedness and response to chemical and biological threats: the role of exposure science. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1378:108-117
Gochfeld, Michael (2016) Sex Differences in Human and Animal Toxicology: Toxicokinetics. Toxicol Pathol :
Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro et al. (2016) Inflammatory mechanisms of pulmonary injury induced by mustards. Toxicol Lett 244:2-7
Lasfar, Ahmed; de la Torre, Andrew; Abushahba, Walid et al. (2016) Concerted action of IFN-α and IFN-λ induces local NK cell immunity and halts cancer growth. Oncotarget :
DeSantis-Rodrigues, Andrea; Chang, Yoke-Chen; Hahn, Rita A et al. (2016) ADAM17 Inhibitors Attenuate Corneal Epithelial Detachment Induced by Mustard Exposure. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 57:1687-98
Composto, Gabriella M; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L et al. (2016) Mitigation of nitrogen mustard mediated skin injury by a novel indomethacin bifunctional prodrug. Exp Mol Pathol 100:522-31
Russo, Daniel P; Kim, Marlene T; Wang, Wenyi et al. (2016) CIIPro: a new read-across portal to fill data gaps using public large-scale chemical and biological data. Bioinformatics :
Safe, Stephen; Jin, Un-Ho; Morpurgo, Benjamin et al. (2016) Nuclear receptor 4A (NR4A) family - orphans no more. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 157:48-60
Kim, Marlene Thai; Huang, Ruili; Sedykh, Alexander et al. (2016) Mechanism Profiling of Hepatotoxicity Caused by Oxidative Stress Using Antioxidant Response Element Reporter Gene Assay Models and Big Data. Environ Health Perspect 124:634-41

Showing the most recent 10 out of 686 publications