The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai seeks to form a new Environmental Health Sciences Core Center-the Mount Sinai Transdisciplinary Center on Health Effects of Early Environmental Exposures. Our Center will leverage Mount Sinai's remarkable recent growth and build on our nationally and internationally recognized programs in children's environmental health. Our Center's mission is to understand how environmental exposures in early life influence health, development, and risk of disease and dysfunction across the life span - in infancy, childhood, adolescence and beyond. We will study the health impacts of chemical, genetic, nutritional, and social exposures and the interactions among them. Our approach will be transdisciplinary and highly translational. We will combine clinical, population-based and biological research with leading-edge genetics, epigenetics, and bioinformatics in the setting of a hospital-based, urban school of medicine. Through our clinical and community partnerships, we will translate our research findings into evidence-based approaches for disease prevention and treatment. To focus our research, our Center will establish three Research Groups: Endocrine and Metabolic Disruption, Neuro-Immunomodulation, and Oxidant-Antioxidant Imbalance. These Research Groups will bring together basic scientists, clinicians and population scientists committed to developing new, transdisciplinary research in environmental health The Research Groups will be supported by three Facility Cores: an Integrated Health Sciences Facility Core with Subcores in Exposure Biomarkers, Molecular Biomarkers, Clinical Population Access, and a Placenta Biobank;an Environmental Epidemiology, Statistics and Informatics Facility Core;and a clinically-oriented Phenotyping and Stress Assessment Facility Core. The Center supports a Pilot Projects Program, a Career Development Program, and a Community Outreach and Engagement Core, committed to bidirectional communication and partnership with the diverse and disadvantaged communities that Mount Sinai serves. Mount Sinai has attracted well-funded senior faculty who will be leaders in our Center, built a strong base of NIEHS funding, constructed new laboratories, assembled multiple prospective birth cohorts, developed a successful research training fellowship in pediatric environmental health, developed a robust Pilot Projects Program, gained designation as a WHO Collaborating Centre, and made significant scientific discoveries. Formation of an NIEHS Core Center will strengthen our program identity, sustain our scientific capacity, and help us build the careers of the young scientists who are our future leaders.

Public Health Relevance

The Mount Sinai Transdisciplinary Center on Health Effects of Early Environmental Exposures will advance public health in the United States and around the world by (1) supporting state-of-the-art research that is designed to discover the environmental causes of disease and disability in children, (2) translating scientific discoveries into new, evidence-based strategies for disease prevention and treatment, and (3) building the careers of young physicians and scientists who will be our nation's future public health leaders.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
1P30ES023515-01
Application #
8619151
Study Section
Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee (EHS)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-06-18
Budget End
2015-03-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$150,363
Indirect Cost
$61,653
Name
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Department
Type
DUNS #
078861598
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10029
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