Today, the advance in translational research requires complex integration of molecular, cellular, animal and human models. This multitude of approaches exceeds the possibilities of a 'standard'laboratory and demands a specialized environment to enhance the success rate and increase the competiveness of our investigators. The Cell and Molecular Analysis Core was developed starting in the second year ofthe Phase I COBRE program. Today this core offers our researchers access to a unique facility on the LSUHSC campus, which provides the latest state-of the-art methodological approaches in cell and molecular biology. This core provides skilled personnel to assist with and/or perform highly specialized experimental procedures. This core is coordinated by Drs. Catalin Filipeanu and Arthur Haas and is organized in the following units: Proteomics, Mass Spectrometry, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Imaging, HPLC, Cell Culture, and Flow-cytometry.
The Specific Aims of this core are: 1) to provide skilled personnel to assist with and/or perform highly specialized procedures for HPLC separation of proteins, 2D separation of proteins for proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry, cell culture, and EPR imaging, 2) to maintain the resources for safe and effective use 3) to provide programs of education and training ofthe methods and instrumentation available in the Core, and 4) to assist investigators in the generation of project data. These facilities are open to all COBRE investigators, as well as researchers throughout the LSUHSC and other institutions. The availability of multiple types of advanced equipment, sophisticated data analysis systems, and specialized personnel dramatically increase the research achievements by current and previous COBRE and LSUHSC investigators. The COBRE Phase III transition for this Core builds upon the previous investments that our University committed to the NCRR Phase I and Phase II programs. In Phase II, the services provided by this COBRE Cell and Molecular Analysis core were integrated under the umbrella ofthe LSUHSC Proteomics Facility, thus providing the foundation for transformation of this successful core to an Institutional facility.

Public Health Relevance

Cardiovascular diseases remain the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States (1) and in Louisiana one in four deaths are caused by cardiovascular complications (2). This core capitalizes on using the expertise of Core Directors and state-of-the-art instrumentation and methodologies that have been developed over the past 10 years to examine the cellular and molecular basis of cardiovascular disease.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
1P30GM106392-01A1
Application #
8735437
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZGM1-TWD-C (C3))
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-09-09
Budget End
2015-07-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$116,800
Indirect Cost
$36,800
Name
Louisiana State Univ Hsc New Orleans
Department
Type
DUNS #
782627814
City
New Orleans
State
LA
Country
United States
Zip Code
70112
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