The primary focus of the Stem Cell Core is the isolation and characterization of various types of stem cells and the fate tracing of their committed derivatives, although it will also be useful for sorting neuronal and glial cells for many IDDRC projects. This is accomplished using flow cytometry, based on the detection of cell surface markers, fluorescent proteins expressed under the control of specific gene promoters within transfected vectors or staining of nucleic acids with various staining dyes. The core is instrumental in the purification and characterization of adult stem cells isolated from neural and skeletal muscle tissue, purification of progenitor cells from iPS (induced Pluripotent Stem) and ES (Embryonic Stem) ceil lines, and isolation of cells whether cultured or from tissue that are expressing a fluorescent protein under the control of a specific promoter in a transfected vector. The core is proficient and experienced in handling zebrafish, mouse, and human cells. The extensive experience of the core's leadership ensures investigators expert assistance for their experiments and training in the use of successful techniques. Our principle objective is to provide both IDDRC and non-IDDRC researchers with comprehensive stem cell and stem cell derivative isolation and characterization services in a timely, dependable and cost-effective manner.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Center Core Grants (P30)
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Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DSR-Y)
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Children's Hospital Boston
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