The goal of the Washington University Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center (WUIDDRC) is to promote cutting-edge Innovation to understand and treat intellectual and developmental disabilities. WUIDDRC would provide core resources for 44 outstanding investigators conducting 62 projects related to intellectual and developmental disabilities. WUIDDRC has four main goals: 1. Promote research on developmental disabilities, through new research opportunities, excellence in research facilities, intellectual stimulation, and Interdisciplinary collaborations. WUIDDRC will focus on investigators studying three complementary but fundamentally interrelated research theme areas: cerebral connectivity, genetics, and environmental influences. 2. Provide efficient, cost-effective, state-of-the-art services and facilities to enhance the quality and productivity of WUIDDRC investigators through five cores: Administration, Biostatistics and Informatics, Human Clinical Studies, Brain Imaging, and Animal Model Studies. 3. Create a strong and efficient infrastructure to support research activities related to developmental disabilities. WUIDDRC will attract established and new investigators to add new knowledge and develop innovations impacting IDD. The strategy is to create opportunities for novel collaboration in a large pool of leading research scientists. 4. Build a mechanism for effective, regular, and frequent communication and coordination among WUIDDRC investigators, researchers in other organizations, clinical providers for children with developmental disabilities, and the local community. Washington University in St. Louis has a long record of excellence in neuroscience. But it has gaps in infrastructure to integrate and coordinate research targeted to intellectual and developmental disabilities. WUIDDRC would make existing, sophisticated, and novel approaches readily accessible to its investigators to close these gaps. A practical outcome is to focus local talent on a pressing health problem that offers considerable potential to advance understanding of human brain development. WUIDDRC will stimulate advances by creating a collaborative, interdisciplinary environment that will accelerate research to directly impact children with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Public Health Relevance

This Center will provide crucial support for 44 scientists and physicians in 12 disciplines undertaking 62 research projects investigating the causes and prevention of intellectual and developmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy and learning problems. The Center will have a strong emphasis on clinical and translational studies, providing vigorous support for research on developmental disability involving both infants/children and animal models. Neuroimaging, a significant strength of Washington University, will provide a bridge between animal and clinical studies, helping define the nature and timing of alterations in brain development associated with developmental disabilities. The Center will provide crucial support for 44 scientists and physicians in 12 disciplines undertaking 62 research projects investigating the causes and prevention of Intellectual and developmental disabilities such as cerebral palsy and learning problems. The Center will have a strong emphasis on clinical and translational studies, providing vigorous support for research on developmental disability involving both infants/children and animal models. Neuroimaging, a significant strength of Washington University, will provide a bridge between animal and clinical studies, helping define the nature and timing of alterations in brain development associated with developmental disabilities.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30HD062171-04
Application #
8501597
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-MRG-C (ID))
Program Officer
Parisi, Melissa
Project Start
2010-08-01
Project End
2015-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$797,518
Indirect Cost
$272,835
Name
Washington University
Department
Pediatrics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
068552207
City
Saint Louis
State
MO
Country
United States
Zip Code
63130
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