The objective of the Human Clinical Phenotyping Core (HCP) is to promote excellence in human phenotyping, with a central mission to facilitate research on intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) by a diverse interdisciplinary team of investigators across the Einstein campus. The Core maintains a centralized easily searchable de-identified database of participants for access by Einstein investigators that includes information about data collection from the Neurogenomics and Translational Neuroimaging Cores, and provides continuity to HCP-enrolled participants as they traverse the different Cores and engage in research projects. The HCP is essential to the mission of the RFK-IDDRC to advance diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of children with developmental disabilities, and is positioned to serve as the central hub for a variety of RFK-IDDRC investigators for whom comprehensive phenotyping is key to understanding the implications of their work. It increases access to the populations of interest, increases the cost-effectiveness of research endeavors in well-characterized clinical populations, and facilitates collaboration among researchers with varied and complementary skill-sets and backgrounds.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30HD071593-02
Application #
8379372
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DSR-Y)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$175,030
Indirect Cost
$70,222
Name
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Department
Type
DUNS #
110521739
City
Bronx
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10461
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