The Coordinating Core is made up of four interacting components. Administrative Unit: overall responsibility for coordinating Center activities with input from the ET, including communications, resource management, evaluation, and insuring compliance with institutional and Federal policies;Data Management and Information Svstems Unit: manages all Center-related data to insure seamless interaction among cores and affiliated research projects;supports the HNRC website and videoconferencing;Statistics Unit: consults with investigators during all study stages, from design to final analyses;also provides ad hoc consultation;Participant Accrual and Retention (PAR) Unit: Recruits and retains participants for specific studies, and maintains the HNRC cohort so it is accessible to investigators to jump start new projects. Since these four components, which might ordinarily be separate cores, are part of one coherent core, we ran into space limitations given the 10-page limit per core. Previously, Dr. Dianne Rausch (NIMH) authorized a 3-page Addendum for each of the Units. This Addendum (section 17) can be found following item """"""""16. Resource Sharing"""""""". Also included in the Addendum is a listing of the projects that have utilized the various Units ofthe Coordinating Core.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
3P30MH062512-12S1
Application #
8505821
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-ERB-M)
Project Start
2001-04-24
Project End
Budget Start
2012-07-09
Budget End
2013-03-31
Support Year
12
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$9,999
Indirect Cost
$3,548
Name
University of California San Diego
Department
Type
DUNS #
804355790
City
La Jolla
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
92093
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Carlozzi, Noelle E; Tulsky, David S; Wolf, Timothy J et al. (2017) Construct validity of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery in individuals with stroke. Rehabil Psychol 62:443-454
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