Depressive symptoms are common in seniors receiving in-home and community-based services. In seniors receiving home-delivered meals, 12% reported clinically significant depression (PHQ >9).(177) In seniors receiving home health nursing, 13.5% met criteria for major depression.(178) The 1 -year incidence of major depression in homebound elders was 3%, and the 1-year incidence for minor depression 7%. (179) Thus, the population of seniors receiving aging services is at high risk for depression and an appropriate target for selective and indicated prevention. Prevention is likely to be highly effective in these seniors, who share many of the depression risk factors identified in epidemiologic research (functional impairments, two or more chronic illnesses, low educational level, and living without a partner, which in one Dutch study identified the 8-10% of the senior population at highest risk for depression).(180-181) Interventions targeting this population could reduce the incidence of depression by one-third to one-half, generating large health gains efficiently, with numbers-needed-to-treat as low as 3-5. (182)

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30MH090333-03
Application #
8465285
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-ERB-F)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-05-01
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$121,553
Indirect Cost
$58,574
Name
University of Pittsburgh
Department
Type
DUNS #
004514360
City
Pittsburgh
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
15213
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Hsu, Jonathan H; Mulsant, Benoit H; Lenze, Eric J et al. (2016) Impact of Prior Treatment on Remission of Late-Life Depression with Venlafaxine and Subsequent Aripiprazole or Placebo Augmentation. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 24:918-22
Smagula, Stephen F; Wallace, Meredith L; Anderson, Stewart J et al. (2016) Combining moderators to identify clinical profiles of patients who will, and will not, benefit from aripiprazole augmentation for treatment resistant late-life major depressive disorder. J Psychiatr Res 81:112-8
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