DEVELOPMENTAL CORE There is an urgent need for advances in neuroAIDS research that may lead to improved diagnostics and patient care. Such advances require an interdisciplinary approach with participation of investigators in basic, behavioral and clinical research. The major goal of the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center Cores (CNACC) is to facilitate interaction between basic science, behavioral research and clinical medicine by providing a mechanism of support for translational investigations through infrastructural and financial support, as well as mentorship. Toward this end, the Developmental Core will provide support for pilot investigations, progress evaluation, guidance, and mentorship. This core application describes the experience of the Core Leaders, the process to recruit and review innovative project applications, and the role the Core will play in mentorship of clinical and basic science faculty and trainees at various levels. It is anticipated that this core will play a pivotal role in enhancing and ensuring the success of neuroAIDS investigators, the advancement of neuroAIDS research and patient care, and the CNACC mission.

Public Health Relevance

To advance the field of neuroAIDS, there is an urgent need to establish new avenues of investigation that bridge the gap between discovery in basic science and promoting improvements in patient care. The Developmental Core will serve to bridge clinical and basic science by promoting pilot projects which are predicted to have high impact and at the same time promote the mentorship and training experiences for investigators at various levels

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30MH092177-02
Application #
8381120
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-ERB-F)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2012-06-01
Budget End
2013-05-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$163,345
Indirect Cost
$56,583
Name
Temple University
Department
Type
DUNS #
057123192
City
Philadelphia
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
19122
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