CORE B. Animal Modeling Core Plans: This core, previously named the Animal Surgery &TBI/SCI Model Core will be renamed Animal Modeling Core to reflect the expansion of the capabilities of this widely used facility beyond its previous use as an animal surgery and neurotrauma modeling resource. While these functions will continue to constitute the central component of the core which will be the Surgery and In Vivo Models Component, we request funding to add physiological (blood pressure, heart rate, arterial oxygenation, body temperature and electrophysiological (e.g. somatosensory evoked potentials, magnetically-evoled inter-enlargement recordings) monitoring capability during the acute recovery period after experimental neurotrauma. In addition, we request support to establish a Viral Vectors Component and a Genetically-Modified Mice Component. These latter two capabilities currently exist within individual SCoBIRC laboratories (Dr. George Smith's lab in the former instance and Dr. Geddes'in the latter case). However, the increasing need for the application of these across multiple laboratories has made it sensible to now expand and incorporate them under the umbrella of our Animal Modeling Core in order to improve access to them and to insure technical standardization across user laboratories.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Center Core Grants (P30)
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National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Initial Review Group (NSD)
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University of Kentucky
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