(NMS) As one of three Stanford Neuroscience Cores, the Neuroscience Microscopy Service (NMS) provides capital-intensive microscopy equipment which is often beyond the budgets of individual labs, and expert training on the available microscopes and image analysis software to enable researchers to achieve the highest quality results. Fluorescence microscopy is an essential technique in current neuroscience research and, with the continual development of genetically encoded fluorescent reporters and new microscope technologies, will remain so for the foreseeable future. During each of the previous four years, NMS has served between 50 and 70 Pis with an annual average of 3500 hours of microscope usage and training time. The majority of this support has gone to NIH-funded neuroscience labs. Over the last four years, NMS has kept its microscopy services updated with the addition of a new SIM/STORM super-resolution microscope, a new laser scanning confocal microscope, the addition of electrophysiological recording capability to its two photon tissue slice rig, and the addition of a new high-powered image analysis workstation equipped with Neurolucida neuron tracing software. Under the proposed grant, NMS will continue to provide the most up-to-date and cutting edge services, including efforts to expand the use of its super-resolution microscope and two photon microscopes.

Public Health Relevance

Fluorescence microscopy is an essential technique in current neuroscience research and, with the continual development of genetically encoded fluorescent reporters and new microscope technologies, will remain so for the foreseeable future. As one of three Stanford Neuroscience Cores, the Neuroscience Microscopy Service (NMS) was created to provide capital-intensive fluorescence microscopy equipment which is often beyond the budgets of individual labs, and expert training on its use to enable researchers to achieve the highest quality results.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30NS069375-07
Application #
9201332
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZNS1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2016-12-01
Budget End
2017-11-30
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2017
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Stanford University
Department
Type
DUNS #
009214214
City
Stanford
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94304
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