The long term objective of the Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics Core Laboratory (FGBCL) is to provide a variety of genomics-based assays, basic proteomic measurements, and bioinformatic analyses in a cost-effective and efficient manner, therefore maximizing the availability of these important tools for all five individual UW SBRP investigators. The FGBCL will furnish microarray-based gene-centric transcript expression analysis (using Affymetrix arrays and/or NimbleGen arrays), ELISA-based measurements, quantitative gene expression evaluations, and bioinformatic analyses of data including the topGO weight method, gene set analysis, and PAINT. The FGBCL services to four investigators (Drs Furlong, Checkoway, Zhang, and Gallagher) will support the specific Biomedical Research objective through "the identification and development of methods and tools to improve our understanding of the relationship of exposure to hazardous substances and health". Furthermore, the FGBCL services offered to Drs Stand/Doty (Project #5) and Gallagher are directed toward the Remediation Research objectives "initiating research on new and innovative remediation strategies and technologies that reduce bioavailability and/or toxicity of hazardous substances" and "development of new, non-invasive methods to characterize hazardous waste sites and for the long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions", respectively. The FGBCL services also supports other goals and objectives of this RFA by "encouraging the use of the technological advances, as appropriate, to support multi-project, interdisciplinary research programs". Specifically, the FGBCL will offer state-of-the-art technologies including microarray-based analyses for genomic-related studies as well as bioinformatic analyses of microarray- and proteomic-derived data. The FGBCL support work will contribute directly to the central theme of this program which is to "focus on a wide range of molecular biology- and proteomic-based measurements that may be predictive of: exposure to toxicants;impaired physiologic function;and/or unusual susceptibility to damage from toxic agents that occur in the environment, particularly those that are commonly present at hazardous waste sites."

Public Health Relevance

The Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics Core Laboratory services provided to these Superfund projects will develop methods and technologies to detect and monitor hazardous substances;will create and validate techniques for the detection and evaluation of the effect on human health of hazardous substances;and will investigate basic biological methods to reduce the amount of hazardous substances in our environment.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Hazardous Substances Basic Research Grants Program (NIEHS) (P42)
Project #
5P42ES004696-26
Application #
8451562
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-LKB-D)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
26
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$255,901
Indirect Cost
$97,481
Name
University of Washington
Department
Type
DUNS #
605799469
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
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