The Biostatistics Core is designed to enhance the UNC Superfund Research Program's assessment and reduction of risks to human health associated with Superfund high priority chemicals. The five projects in the SRP present considerable biostatistical issues and bioinformatics challenges that are central to the success of the projects. Our overall aims are to (i) provide state-of-the-art biostatistics and bioinformatics expertise, end-user analytical support, and tool development;(ii) to develop new methods and tools as necessary to address project objectives;(iii) to foster a unique training environment for students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty to prepare them for the new and complex challenges presented by modern datasets. The Core faculty and staff have a range of complementary skills, which will lead to a unified approaches to data interpretation, integration and cross-platform analysis. Collectively, the Core is highly relevant to the Superfund Program, as it will: ? support interdisciplinary (toxicology, genetics, biostatistics, pharmacokinetic modeling) research to elucidate the genetic basis of dose-response and susceptibility; ? develop and use state-of-the-art statistical techniques and analysis tools for systems biology approaches; ? identify potential biomarkers linked to genetic differences in toxicant metabolism and/or response;and ? generate knowledge that is directly applicable to quantitative elucidation of risk. The Core will be involved at the earliest stages of each project, assisting investigators in each step of planning and executing the projects. Each Core faculty member is assigned a role to two projects. A staff statistician with considerable bioinformatics experience will serve as a dedicated analyst, under the guidance of Core faculty members. The Core director will report to the SRP Director, and members, who already collaborate extensively, will meet regularly with the investigators and with each other to plan and exchange ideas.

Public Health Relevance

The overall Program is highly relevant to public health, providing improved understanding of risk sources and risk variation due to exposure to hazardous chemicals. The Biostatistics Core will enhance this relevance, maximizing the information gained from each project and enabling the use of modern bioinformatics approaches to complex datasets.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Hazardous Substances Basic Research Grants Program (NIEHS) (P42)
Project #
3P42ES005948-21S1
Application #
8885024
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
21
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
Reif, David M; Truong, Lisa; Mandrell, David et al. (2016) High-throughput characterization of chemical-associated embryonic behavioral changes predicts teratogenic outcomes. Arch Toxicol 90:1459-70
Brooks, Samira A; Martin, Elizabeth; Smeester, Lisa et al. (2016) miRNAs as common regulators of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway in the preeclamptic placenta and cadmium-treated trophoblasts: Links between the environment, the epigenome and preeclampsia. Food Chem Toxicol 98:50-57
Wu, Tao P; Wang, Tao; Seetin, Matthew G et al. (2016) DNA methylation on N(6)-adenine in mammalian embryonic stem cells. Nature 532:329-33
Zabinski, Joseph W; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo; Rubio-Andrade, Marisela et al. (2016) Advancing Dose-Response Assessment Methods for Environmental Regulatory Impact Analysis: A Bayesian Belief Network Approach Applied to Inorganic Arsenic. Environ Sci Technol Lett 3:200-204
Tian, Xu; Patel, Keyur; Ridpath, John R et al. (2016) Homologous Recombination and Translesion DNA Synthesis Play Critical Roles on Tolerating DNA Damage Caused by Trace Levels of Hexavalent Chromium. PLoS One 11:e0167503
Smith, Martyn T; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Gibbons, Catherine F et al. (2016) Key Characteristics of Carcinogens as a Basis for Organizing Data on Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis. Environ Health Perspect 124:713-21
Chappell, Grace; Silva, Grace O; Uehara, Takeki et al. (2016) Characterization of copy number alterations in a mouse model of fibrosis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma reveals concordance with human disease. Cancer Med 5:574-85
Sharma, Vyom; Collins, Leonard B; Chen, Ting-Huei et al. (2016) Oxidative stress at low levels can induce clustered DNA lesions leading to NHEJ mediated mutations. Oncotarget 7:25377-90
Lai, Yongquan; Yu, Rui; Hartwell, Hadley J et al. (2016) Measurement of Endogenous versus Exogenous Formaldehyde-Induced DNA-Protein Crosslinks in Animal Tissues by Stable Isotope Labeling and Ultrasensitive Mass Spectrometry. Cancer Res 76:2652-61
Adrion, Alden C; Nakamura, Jun; Shea, Damian et al. (2016) Screening Nonionic Surfactants for Enhanced Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Remaining in Soil After Conventional Biological Treatment. Environ Sci Technol 50:3838-45

Showing the most recent 10 out of 453 publications