Administrative Core: Abstract The Administrative Core serves as the central organizing structure for the SRP. Its primary roles are to provide leadership;administrative and accounting support for the SRP;coordinate activities within the program; facilitate cross-disciplinary research, especially between biomedical and non-biomedical projects;serve as a communications facilitator and source of information for our stakeholders and the EAC, the media, and the general public;coordinate and facilitate research translation and community engagement activities for the program;coordinate and facilitate the education and training programs;coordinate and facilitate the planning and oversight functions of the program;and assist in other administrative and communications activities as necessary. This office will be staffed by an Office/Financial Manager, an Administrative/Financial Assistant, the Research Translation Coordinator and Core Leader, the Community Engagement Coordinator and Core Leader, and the Director and Associate Director of the program. These activities will be achieved in a transparent manner by the collaborative interaction of Administrative Core faculty and staff with the entire SRP faculty, with input and guidance from our External Advisory Committee (EAC). Every Monday the Director will meet with the Administrative Core staff for 1-2 hours to discuss and plan core activities. Every other week the Director will meet with the PLs and coordinators of the Research Translation and Community Engagement Cores to discuss and plan core activities. In addition, once a month the SRP Executive Committee, composed of all Leaders and Co-Leaders of all projects and Cores, will meet to discuss, review and coordinate all aspects of the program. We will host weekly seminars, an annual "Superfun Day" for our trainees, a program retreat, administer a pilot project program funded with Dartmouth financial support, and enhance and facilitate cross- disciplinary training and collaboration. Once a year the EAC will visit to provide guidance on the scientific merit of our research, the relevance of all program components, the integration of research among all projects, the appropriateness of our training activities, and the effectiveness of research translation and community engagement.

Public Health Relevance

Administrative Core: Narrative The Administrative Core is the central organizing element of the Dartmouth Superfund Research Program. The Core is basically responsible for the smooth operation and oversight of the program and thus, plays a very essential role in the success of the program.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
Hazardous Substances Basic Research Grants Program (NIEHS) (P42)
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Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1)
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Dartmouth College
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