This application proposes that the BU SRP Training Core will continue to provide interdisciplinary training in laboratory science, bioinformatics and computational biology, while also expanding the Training Core to act as a common reference point for all graduate students and post-doctoral fellows who work within the BU SRP program (including those who are supported by other BU SRP projects, other related training programs, and directly by the Training Core). The Training Core will directly support two students a year in bioinformatics techniques applied to the laboratory sciences, with an emphasis on analysis of high throughput, genome-wide data sets and on molecular modeling. This focus responds to the strategic importance of these methods for the biology of the future, the relative lack of exposure to them in traditional laboratory training programs, and the unique resources ofthe applicant institution. A major element ofthe program theme, the susceptibility ofthe developing organism to low-level xenobiotic exposures through a variety of pathways, is ideally suited to be the context for this cross discipline training. After nomination by project PIs at the end of their first year of study, two students will be selected by a Steering Committee consisting ofthe Program Director, the Training Core Director, and two additional BUSRP PIs, contingent on their commitment to one of the laboratories within the BUSRP. These students will receive appropriate core courses covering bioinformatics, reproduction and development, environmental health, and toxicology during their training program. In addition, we focus on communication skills, not only within the scientific community but to disseminate scientific knowledge to the broader community and to close the """"""""communication gap"""""""" between bench and laboratory science and the public at large. Importantly, the Training Core will orient graduate students and post-doctoral fellows supported by BU SRP projects or the Training Core to the mission, activities and needs of the NIEHS SRP, EPA and state environmental and health agencies;and thereby develop a sense of shared mission and peer network as they work towards advancing the science needed to provide a firm foundation for solving the complex health and environmental issues associated with the nation's hazardous waste sites.

Public Health Relevance

The program has direct relevance to public health due to the broad exposure of the public to many potentially toxic substances in everyday life. As the body of scientists trainined in the field increases, we can anticipate enhanced understanding ofthe potential danger posed by many of these substances and thus reduce the risk to the health ofthe general population

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Hazardous Substances Basic Research Grants Program (NIEHS) (P42)
Project #
5P42ES007381-18
Application #
8659421
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-JAB-J)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-04-01
Budget End
2015-03-31
Support Year
18
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$203,072
Indirect Cost
$75,599
Name
Boston University
Department
Type
DUNS #
604483045
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02118
Townley, Ian K; Karchner, Sibel I; Skripnikova, Elena et al. (2017) Sequence and functional characterization of hypoxia-inducible factors, HIF1?, HIF2?a, and HIF3?, from the estuarine fish, Fundulus heteroclitus. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 312:R412-R425
Whitehead, Andrew; Clark, Bryan W; Reid, Noah M et al. (2017) When evolution is the solution to pollution: Key principles, and lessons from rapid repeated adaptation of killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) populations. Evol Appl 10:762-783
Holland, Erika B; Goldstone, Jared V; Pessah, Isaac N et al. (2017) Ryanodine receptor and FK506 binding protein 1 in the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus): A phylogenetic and population-based comparison. Aquat Toxicol 192:105-115
Hahn, Mark E; Karchner, Sibel I; Merson, Rebeka R (2017) Diversity as Opportunity: Insights from 600 Million Years of AHR Evolution. Curr Opin Toxicol 2:58-71
Martinez, Andres; Hadnott, Bailey N; Awad, Andrew M et al. (2017) Release of Airborne Polychlorinated Biphenyls from New Bedford Harbor Results in Elevated Concentrations in the Surrounding Air. Environ Sci Technol Lett 4:127-131
Parente, Thiago E; Moreira, Daniel A; Magalhães, Maithê G P et al. (2017) The liver transcriptome of suckermouth armoured catfish (Pterygoplichthys anisitsi, Loricariidae): Identification of expansions in defensome gene families. Mar Pollut Bull 115:352-361
Butler, Lindsey J; Janulewicz, Patricia A; Carwile, Jenny L et al. (2017) Childhood and adolescent fish consumption and adult neuropsychological performance: An analysis from the Cape Cod Health Study. Neurotoxicol Teratol 61:47-57
Reid, Noah M; Jackson, Craig E; Gilbert, Don et al. (2017) The landscape of extreme genomic variation in the highly adaptable Atlantic killifish. Genome Biol Evol :
Vieira, Verónica M; Villanueva, Carolina; Chang, Jenny et al. (2017) Impact of community disadvantage and air pollution burden on geographic disparities of ovarian cancer survival in California. Environ Res 156:388-393
Hoffman, Kate; Weisskopf, Marc G; Roberts, Andrea L et al. (2017) Geographic Patterns of Autism Spectrum Disorder Among Children of Participants in Nurses' Health Study II. Am J Epidemiol 186:834-842

Showing the most recent 10 out of 377 publications