The Community Engagement Core (CEC) is a community-university partnership to help reduce exposures to cross border flows of hazardous wastes and to improve environmental public health in the San Diego-Tijuana city-region. The CEC will utilize community-based participatory processes to engage and learn from community leaders how best to assist in building the capacity of vulnerable communities to identify, prioritize and address Superfund-related environmental health hazards and issues. We will do this with the help of a CEC advisory committee composed of community leaders, scientists, government officials and several grassroots environmental organizations active in the U.S.-Mexico border region. Our proposal has four aims: (1) In consultation with our community partners, produce and update a toxicant survey and environmental health protection needs assessment for the Tijuana-San Diego border region based on literature, workshops, existing field research (e.g., source tracking of hazardous waste flows), and some testing of soil, sediment and water by our Research Translation Core;(2) Launch a series of community workshops in partnership with Casa Familiar (San Diego) and Alter Terra (Tijuana), our two lead community-based partners, titled "Making Science Matter;Community-University Engagement for a Healthier Society." These workshops will bring community leaders, experts and scientists together in a two-way learning experience where the community learns about the relevant translational science from our SRP, and we learn from the communities their regional needs, priorities and concerns to help develop future research directions as well as explore the solutions to environmental health issues dealing with Superfund toxicant exposures. Two areas of concern identified by our community partners include the contamination taking place as a result of uncontrolled hazardous waste disposal, and soil contamination in areas where people are growing their own food;(3) Cocreate with our community partners individual and team-based opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to design and carry out community-based service learning projects, and (4) Building on the success of the Los Laureles Canyon documentary we will co-author a series of bilingual (Spanish-English) reports, guides and science communication videos with our community partners that can serve as community empowerment tools. Our progress will be systematically evaluated using a logic model on an annual basis with input from our external advisory committee. We will share our progress and lessons learned with border communities, the U.S.EPA, ATSDR, PEPH, and the NIEHS Community Engagement network.

Public Health Relevance

Crossborder flows of hazardous wastes and contamination of soil, water and sediments negatively impact many low-income communities straddling the U.S.-Mexico border. The U.S. EPA Border 2012 program, local, state and other federal agencies identify this as a problem. Our effort engages communities in San Diego and Tijuana to improve cross border science communication, solutions-based project planning, and public understanding of environmental risks posed by exposures to superfund toxicants

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Hazardous Substances Basic Research Grants Program (NIEHS) (P42)
Project #
2P42ES010337-11A1
Application #
8263122
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-JAB-J (SF))
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2012-04-26
Budget End
2013-03-31
Support Year
11
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$147,058
Indirect Cost
$52,105
Name
University of California San Diego
Department
Type
DUNS #
804355790
City
La Jolla
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
92093
Wall, Christopher E; Yu, Ruth T; Atkins, Anne R et al. (2016) Nuclear receptors and AMPK: can exercise mimetics cure diabetes? J Mol Endocrinol 57:R49-58
Liu, Weilin; Struik, Dicky; Nies, Vera J M et al. (2016) Effective treatment of steatosis and steatohepatitis by fibroblast growth factor 1 in mouse models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 113:2288-93
Hirashima, Rika; Michimae, Hirofumi; Takemoto, Hiroaki et al. (2016) Induction of the UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 during the Perinatal Period Can Cause Neurodevelopmental Toxicity. Mol Pharmacol 90:265-74
Park, Charlie C; Nguyen, Phirum; Hernandez, Carolyn et al. (2016) Magnetic Resonance Elastography vs Transient Elastography in Detection of Fibrosis and Noninvasive Measurement of Steatosis in Patients with Biopsy-proven Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. Gastroenterology :
Guo, Lan; Ganguly, Abantika; Sun, Lingling et al. (2016) Global Fitness Profiling Identifies Arsenic and Cadmium Tolerance Mechanisms in Fission Yeast. G3 (Bethesda) 6:3317-3333
Karin, Michael; Dhar, Debanjan (2016) Liver carcinogenesis: from naughty chemicals to soothing fat and the surprising role of NRF2. Carcinogenesis 37:541-6
Booth, D R; Ding, N; Parnell, G P et al. (2016) Cistromic and genetic evidence that the vitamin D receptor mediates susceptibility to latitude-dependent autoimmune diseases. Genes Immun 17:213-9
Umemura, Atsushi; He, Feng; Taniguchi, Koji et al. (2016) p62, Upregulated during Preneoplasia, Induces Hepatocellular Carcinogenesis by Maintaining Survival of Stressed HCC-Initiating Cells. Cancer Cell 29:935-48
Liu, Miao; Chen, Shujuan; Yueh, Mei-Fei et al. (2016) Cadmium and arsenic override NF-κB developmental regulation of the intestinal UGT1A1 gene and control of hyperbilirubinemia. Biochem Pharmacol 110-111:37-46
Hsin, I-Fang; Montano, Erica; Seki, Ekihiro (2016) Finding a new role for NEMO: A key player in preventing hepatocyte apoptosis and liver tumorigenesis by inhibiting RIPK1. Hepatology 64:295-7

Showing the most recent 10 out of 331 publications