The Analytical Core provides routine and non-routine analytical service to the University of lowa research program. The core provides expert staff, equipment, and instrumentation in line with five Aims.
Specific Aim 1 is the development of analytical and quality control/assurance standards. In close collaboration with the Synthesis Core, which is responsible for acquiring and archiving individual compound standards and preparing stock solutions, the Analytical Core develops the mathematical methods for congener representation, analyzes single congener solutions for purity assessment and quality control, and tests the prepared standard solutions against certified Standard Reference Materials, including PCB calibration mixtures.
Specific Aim 2 is the development of a mixture of PCB congeners for laboratory animal exposure studies. The Analytical Core develop the mathematical methods to design the exposure mixture and tests the prepared mixtures against certified Standard Reference Materials.
Specific Aim 3 is the analysis of environmental and laboratory samples for a suite of PCB congener. The Analytical Core will extract and analyze PCBs on a congener-specific basis: 209 congeners are detected as individual or coeluting sets. We typically achieve 170 congener separations in environmental samples. Applying the primary calibration standard developed under Aim 1, samples are quantified by the internal standard method. Internal Standards and Surrogate Recovery Standards developed under Aim 1 are used to precisely determine PCB concentrations in samples. Methods for analysis on a congener-specific basis are assessed using performance standard injections and analysis of certified Standard Reference Materials. Most analyses are performed on the entire suite of PCB congeners, including laboratory animals exposed to the mixtures described in Aim 2 and including blood from humans and non-laboratory animals. Other samples are analyzed for specific congeners and metabolites in support of investigators focused on congener-specific toxicology.
Specific Aim 4 involves the extraction, identification, and quantification of unknown metabolites. The Analytical Core determines purity of synthesized metabolites and associated analytical standards, then analyzes for hydroxylated PCBs and other PCB metabolites. As requested by the isbrp investigators, the Analytical Core will also train personnel and assist in sampling design and implementation.
Specific Aim 5 is the design and maintenance of a database system. A redundant storage architecture with automatic backup and password protection is used to allow investigators to download data and reports produced by the Analytical Core.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Hazardous Substances Basic Research Grants Program (NIEHS) (P42)
Project #
5P42ES013661-08
Application #
8451614
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-LWJ-M)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$316,663
Indirect Cost
$104,461
Name
University of Iowa
Department
Type
DUNS #
062761671
City
Iowa City
State
IA
Country
United States
Zip Code
52242
Uwimana, Eric; Li, Xueshu; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim (2018) Human Liver Microsomes Atropselectively Metabolize 2,2',3,4',6-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 91) to a 1,2-Shift Product as the Major Metabolite. Environ Sci Technol 52:6000-6008
Herkert, Nicholas J; Hornbuckle, Keri C (2018) Effects of room airflow on accurate determination of PUF-PAS sampling rates in the indoor environment. Environ Sci Process Impacts 20:757-766
Herkert, Nicholas J; Spak, Scott N; Smith, Austen et al. (2018) Calibration and evaluation of PUF-PAS sampling rates across the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) network. Environ Sci Process Impacts 20:210-219
Dhakal, Kiran; Gadupudi, Gopi S; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim et al. (2018) Sources and toxicities of phenolic polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs). Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 25:16277-16290
Enayah, Sabah H; Vanle, Brigitte C; Fuortes, Laurence J et al. (2018) PCB95 and PCB153 change dopamine levels and turn-over in PC12 cells. Toxicology 394:93-101
Klinefelter, Kelsey; Hooven, Molly Kromme; Bates, Chloe et al. (2018) Genetic differences in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and CYP1A2 affect sensitivity to developmental polychlorinated biphenyl exposure in mice: relevance to studies of human neurological disorders. Mamm Genome 29:112-127
Gourronc, Francoise A; Robertson, Larry W; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J (2018) A delayed proinflammatory response of human preadipocytes to PCB126 is dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 25:16481-16492
Alam, Sinthia; Carter, Gwendolyn S; Krager, Kimberly J et al. (2018) PCB11 Metabolite, 3,3'-Dichlorobiphenyl-4-ol, Exposure Alters the Expression of Genes Governing Fatty Acid Metabolism in the Absence of Functional Sirtuin 3: Examining the Contribution of MnSOD. Antioxidants (Basel) 7:
Li, Xueshu; Holland, Erika B; Feng, Wei et al. (2018) Authentication of synthetic environmental contaminants and their (bio)transformation products in toxicology: polychlorinated biphenyls as an example. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 25:16508-16521
Sethi, Sunjay; Keil, Kimberly P; Lein, Pamela J (2018) 3,3'-Dichlorobiphenyl (PCB 11) promotes dendritic arborization in primary rat cortical neurons via a CREB-dependent mechanism. Arch Toxicol 92:3337-3345

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