Core A - Administrative Core: The Core will take a leadership role in ensuring the synthesis of findings and activities from research projects and cores of the Penn-SRP towards translating research on asbestos fate, exposure remediation, and adverse health effects. In addition, direct lines of communication between the Administrative Core, the Community Engagement Core, the Research Translation Core, the Biostatistics Research Core, and the Interdisciplinary Training Core (DTC) will be maintained. These goals will be accomplished through the leadership of two senior highly accomplished investigators - Dr. Ian A. Blair (Director) and Dr. Trevor M. Penning (Deputy Director). Both of these investigators have had highly productive scientific careers, each with over 250 publications. In addition, they have both already had extensive interactions with the NIEHS administrators. It is noteworthy that the Penn SRP is underpinned by four highly significant entities. First, the Penn Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology (CEET) (P30 EHSCC) provides an academic home, with enormous resources to draw upon. Second, the CEET Translational Biomarker Core can provide an array of instrumentation and resources for conducting biomarker discovery and validation studies. Third, the CEET Integrative Health Sciences Facility Core can provide support for human subject study design and the storage of annotated biospecimens within a virtual repository. Fourth, the existing CEET Certificate Program and T32 Training Program in Environmental Health Sciences provides a resource of potential students and postdoctoral fellows who could be recruited into the Penn SRP Center. Highly trained administrative (Ms. Shwed) and fiscal oversight (Mr. Kelly) personnel are available to ensure that the Core runs smoothly. Therefore, the entire infrastructure of the Administrative Core is in place and has the demonstrated capability to ensure that the Penn SRP Center will run smoothly. The Penn SRP Center's Administrative Core will establish lines of communication among the Center Project and Core leaders in order to encourage and ensure there is integration and interaction between the environmental science (Projects 1 and 2) and biomedical projects (Projects 3-6) under the following three Specific Aims:
Aim 1 : To manage the fiscal resources of the Penn-SRP Center, submit all required Progress Reports, and maintain a working relationship with SRP Officers at NIEHS.
Aim 2 : To provide oversight to the success of the SRP Center by scheduling monthly meetings of the Executive Committee comprised of all Project and Core leaders, by scheduling annual meetings of the External Advisory Board, and by conducting formative and summative evaluations. An important goal of the Penn SRP is to foster collaborative transdisciplinary research involving six different Departments in two Schools at Penn as well as Fox-Chase Cancer Center.
Aim 3 : To foster creative inter- disciplinary collaboration between investigators within the Penn-SRP Center by organizing and scheduling monthly research in progress talks to be given by all Penn-SRP Center investigators, including students and postdoctoral trainees and by scheduling with the IDTC monthly seminars and an annual symposium. The SRP annual symposium will coincide with the EAB annual meeting so that external advisors and NIEHS staff can be informed of Center progress.
Aim 4 : Promote translation of Penn-SRP findings by working with the Research Translation and Community Outreach Cores.

Public Health Relevance

Core A - Administrative Core: The Core will take a leadership role in ensuring the synthesis of findings and activities from research projects and cores towards translating research on asbestos fate, exposure remediation, and adverse health effects. In addition, direct lines of communication between the Administrative Core, the Community Engagement Core, the Research Translation Core, the Biostatistics Research Core, and the Interdisciplinary Training Core are maintained. These goals will be accomplished through the leadership of two senior highly accomplished investigators - Dr. Ian A. Blair (Director) and Dr. Trevor M. Penning (Deputy Director).

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Hazardous Substances Basic Research Grants Program (NIEHS) (P42)
Project #
1P42ES023720-01
Application #
8651083
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-LKB-K (S))
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-04-01
Budget End
2015-03-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$146,237
Indirect Cost
$54,839
Name
University of Pennsylvania
Department
Type
DUNS #
042250712
City
Philadelphia
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
19104
Salamatipour, Ashkan; Mohanty, Sanjay K; Pietrofesa, Ralph A et al. (2016) Asbestos Fiber Preparation Methods Affect Fiber Toxicity. Environ Sci Technol Lett 3:270-274
Clapp, Justin T; Roberts, Jody A; Dahlberg, Britt et al. (2016) Realities of environmental toxicity and their ramifications for community engagement. Soc Sci Med 170:143-151
Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Velalopoulou, Anastasia; Lehman, Stacey L et al. (2016) Novel Double-Hit Model of Radiation and Hyperoxia-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage Relevant to Space Travel. Int J Mol Sci 17:
Frey, Alexander J; Wang, Qingqing; Busch, Christine et al. (2016) Validation of highly sensitive simultaneous targeted and untargeted analysis of keto-steroids by Girard P derivatization and stable isotope dilution-liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry. Steroids 116:60-66
Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Velalopoulou, Anastasia; Arguiri, Evguenia et al. (2016) Flaxseed lignans enriched in secoisolariciresinol diglucoside prevent acute asbestos-induced peritoneal inflammation in mice. Carcinogenesis 37:177-87
Guo, Lili; Worth, Andrew J; Mesaros, Clementina et al. (2016) Diisopropylethylamine/hexafluoroisopropanol-mediated ion-pairing ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for phosphate and carboxylate metabolite analysis: utility for studying cellular metabolism. Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 30:1835-45
Kadariya, Yuwaraj; Menges, Craig W; Talarchek, Jacqueline et al. (2016) Inflammation-Related IL1β/IL1R Signaling Promotes the Development of Asbestos-Induced Malignant Mesothelioma. Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 9:406-14
Kadariya, Yuwaraj; Cheung, Mitchell; Xu, Jinfei et al. (2016) Bap1 Is a Bona Fide Tumor Suppressor: Genetic Evidence from Mouse Models Carrying Heterozygous Germline Bap1 Mutations. Cancer Res 76:2836-44
Ohar, Jill A; Cheung, Mitchell; Talarchek, Jacqueline et al. (2016) Germline BAP1 Mutational Landscape of Asbestos-Exposed Malignant Mesothelioma Patients with Family History of Cancer. Cancer Res 76:206-15
Mesaros, Clementina; Blair, Ian A (2016) Mass spectrometry-based approaches to targeted quantitative proteomics in cardiovascular disease. Clin Proteomics 13:20

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