The Administrative Core is a critical part of the Charleston Alcohol Research Center since it acts as the coordinating center for seven components (two clinical research components, three basic research components, one research translation/Information dissemination component, and one pilot project component), and the Shared Core. This Core provides the organizational framework that is necessary for the effective and efficient management of Center resources. Under the supervision of the Director, the Administrative Core staff manages the day-to-day operations of the Center, addresses emergent and scientific issues, monitors all budgetary matters, defines and develops internal and external quality control mechanisms, integrates all the components of the Center, acts as a liaison between the Center and the local and regional community, and, provides professional development and scientific enrichment experiences. As the hub of the Charleston ARC, the Administrative Core must provide expert leadership and a strong organizational structure. The Administrative Core has had minimal turnover in leadership or staff since its inception. The Administrative Core is located in the Center for Drug and Alcohol Programs on the campus of the Medical University of South Carolina. The Director of the Administrative Core, the two Scientific Directors, and the Core's Administrative staff have offices in close proximity to each other. The leadership team is comprised of senior scientists with career commitments to alcohol research. Importantly, they represent both clinical and basic science backgrounds. This blend of scientific expertise facilitates the Center's interest in translational and interdisciplinary research. The Steering Committee serves to ensure internal communication and focuses on operational issues. The external Program Advisory Committee provides scientific direction and scientific interchange. In summary, the Administrative Core has an experienced and proven infrastructure that is well able to ensure that the Charleston Alcohol Research Center accomplishes the objectives defined in its mission statement.

Public Health Relevance

An Alcohol Research Center, such as the one at the Medical University of South Carolina, that focuses on improving treatments for alcoholism is important because it brings together a multidisciplinary team of researchers to address a major health problem. If, through this research, new treatment or treatment targets can be identified, it may be possible to prevent the transition from controlled to uncontrolled drinking, thereby reducing the burden of alcohol abuse on the individual, the family, and society as a whole.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50AA010761-18
Application #
8434185
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAA1-GG)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-01-01
Budget End
2013-12-31
Support Year
18
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$408,138
Indirect Cost
$130,754
Name
Medical University of South Carolina
Department
Type
DUNS #
183710748
City
Charleston
State
SC
Country
United States
Zip Code
29425
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