The Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism (CTNA) places a high priority on maintaining an efficient flow of information to promote the safe and successful completion of proposed studies, to support the initiation of novel pilot studies, to facilitate the career development of trainees and junior faculty affiliated with the Center, and to promote the dissemination of research advances. However, the CTNA views its mission as "translational" in that it places a high priority on the interplay between basic and clinical neuroscience. Thus, its administrative, monitoring, and educational components include representation from basic and clinical neuroscience, and an essential charge of these is to preserve the integrity of the translational mission. The Administrative Core provides for the centralized organizational functions of the Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism (CTNA). These functions include 1) the central executive function of the Center (Director, Executive Committee), 2) financial oversight, 3) data safety monitoring (Data Safety Monitoring Board), 4) educational functions (Education Committee), 5) and external ongoing review of the scientific merit of CTNA activities (Scientific Advisory Board).

Public Health Relevance

The Administrative Core has a central organizing function designed to oversee the financial expenditures, data quality, safety of participants, educational activities and scientific merit of the CTNA activities. An overarching goal is to promote the integration of scientific information from animal research and human studies in order to understand mechanisms of alcoholism risk and to provide a scientific foundation for the development of prevention efforts and treatment interventions.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
Application #
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAA1-GG)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
Fiscal Year
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Yale University
New Haven
United States
Zip Code
DeLorenzo, Christine; DellaGioia, Nicole; Bloch, Michael et al. (2015) In vivo ketamine-induced changes in [¹¹C]ABP688 binding to metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5. Biol Psychiatry 77:266-75
Li, Dawei; Zhao, Hongyu; Kranzler, Henry R et al. (2015) Genome-wide association study of copy number variations (CNVs) with opioid dependence. Neuropsychopharmacology 40:1016-26
Xie, Pingxing; Kranzler, Henry R; Krystal, John H et al. (2014) Deep resequencing of 17 glutamate system genes identifies rare variants in DISC1 and GRIN2B affecting risk of opioid dependence. Addict Biol 19:955-64
Barker, Jacqueline M; Taylor, Jane R (2014) Habitual alcohol seeking: modeling the transition from casual drinking to addiction. Neurosci Biobehav Rev 47:281-94
Steele, Vaughn R; Claus, Eric D; Aharoni, Eyal et al. (2014) A large scale (N=102) functional neuroimaging study of error processing in a Go/NoGo task. Behav Brain Res 268:127-38
Darcq, Emmanuel; Hamida, Sami Ben; Wu, Su et al. (2014) Inhibition of striatal-enriched tyrosine phosphatase 61 in the dorsomedial striatum is sufficient to increased ethanol consumption. J Neurochem 129:1024-34
Yang, Can; Li, Cong; Kranzler, Henry R et al. (2014) Exploring the genetic architecture of alcohol dependence in African-Americans via analysis of a genomewide set of common variants. Hum Genet 133:617-24
Morean, Meghan E; DeMartini, Kelly S; Leeman, Robert F et al. (2014) Psychometrically improved, abbreviated versions of three classic measures of impulsivity and self-control. Psychol Assess 26:1003-20
Xu, Hongqin; Wang, Fan; Liu, Yawen et al. (2014) Sex-biased methylome and transcriptome in human prefrontal cortex. Hum Mol Genet 23:1260-70
Krystal, John H; State, Matthew W (2014) Psychiatric disorders: diagnosis to therapy. Cell 157:201-14

Showing the most recent 10 out of 169 publications