The Administrative Core has responsibility for assuring that the ADRC overall aim is to provide a research milieu that facilitates the acquisition of new knowledge about the pathobiology of AD and related neurodegenerative dementing disorders and applies this knowledge to the development of experimental therapeutics. The Director, Associate Director, and Administrator, in collaboration with the Executive Committee, continue to coordinate and Integrate ADRC components, activities, and resources;solicit pilot project applications;foster Interactions with the scientific and lay communities to assure relevant scientific and educational initiatives;assure compliance with human subjects, animal welfare, scientific integrity, and financial policy requirements at NIH;foster Interactions with other investigators, centers, and the NACC;enhance and support AD-relevant research programs at the University of Washington;and assure timely and routine transmissions of appropriate data sets to the NACC. The External Advisory Committee comprised of leaders of other ADRCs has provided valuable guidance to help refocus ADRC themes following changes in ADRC faculty and to enhance overall recruitment and ethnic minority participation in biomedical studies and longitudinal follow-up. The pilot project program has continued a successful review system relying on multiple knowledgeable outside reviewers for each proposal. Administrative Core personnel continue actively to provide expertise to the national Alzheimer's Association and local Alzheimer's Association chapters, support NIA AD-related grant review efforts, and participate In development of the NACC Uniform Data Set. Particular attention has been directed to organizing and participating in multi-site ADC collaborative studies.

Public Health Relevance

Understanding the pathobiology of AD is essential to developing more effective treatment and prevention strategies. A well functioning administrative core is necessary to manage and Integrate a successful multidisciplinary research effort.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50AG005136-30
Application #
8459474
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-4)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-05-01
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
30
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$288,919
Indirect Cost
$32,542
Name
University of Washington
Department
Type
DUNS #
605799469
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
Ridge, Perry G; Hoyt, Kaitlyn B; Boehme, Kevin et al. (2016) Assessment of the genetic variance of late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Neurobiol Aging 41:200.e13-20
Toledo, Jon B; Gopal, Pallavi; Raible, Kevin et al. (2016) Pathological α-synuclein distribution in subjects with coincident Alzheimer's and Lewy body pathology. Acta Neuropathol 131:393-409
Ringman, John M; Monsell, Sarah; Ng, Denise W et al. (2016) Neuropathology of Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease in the National Alzheimer Coordinating Center Database. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 75:284-90
Brenowitz, Willa D; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Keene, C Dirk et al. (2016) Mixed neuropathologies and estimated rates of clinical progression in a large autopsy sample. Alzheimers Dement :
Besser, Lilah M; Alosco, Michael L; Ramirez Gomez, Liliana et al. (2016) Late-Life Vascular Risk Factors and Alzheimer Disease Neuropathology in Individuals with Normal Cognition. J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 75:955-962
Crane, Paul K; Gibbons, Laura E; McCurry, Susan M et al. (2016) Importance of home study visit capacity in dementia studies. Alzheimers Dement 12:419-26
Burke, Shanna L; Maramaldi, Peter; Cadet, Tamara et al. (2016) Neuropsychiatric symptoms and Apolipoprotein E: Associations with eventual Alzheimer's disease development. Arch Gerontol Geriatr 65:231-8
Beckelman, Brenna C; Zhou, Xueyan; Keene, C Dirk et al. (2016) Impaired Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1A Expression in Alzheimer's Disease. Neurodegener Dis 16:39-43
Henderson, Benjamin W; Gentry, Erik G; Rush, Travis et al. (2016) Rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) is increased in Alzheimer's disease and ROCK1 depletion reduces amyloid-β levels in brain. J Neurochem 138:525-31
Tosto, Giuseppe; Monsell, Sarah E; Hawes, Stephen E et al. (2016) Progression of Extrapyramidal Signs in Alzheimer's Disease: Clinical and Neuropathological Correlates. J Alzheimers Dis 49:1085-93

Showing the most recent 10 out of 583 publications