The Neuropathology Core (Core D) of the Johns Hopkins Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) has two overarching goals, one related to the analysis and distribution of brain tissue and other specimens from subjects in the ADRC, and the other related to the analysis of genetically engineered mouse models by investigators associated with the ADRC.
The specific aims of Core D are as follows: (1) to arrange and perform autopsies on clinically well-characterized subjects enrolled through the JHMI ADRC and assist with consensus diagnoses on subjects associated with the ADRC (comprised of the Clinic Cohort and the BLSA Cohort). (2) to accession and store optimally prepared tissues from the autopsies and to make these specimens available to investigators associated with the ADRC and at other collaborating institutions. (3) to accession and store samples of biological fluids and DNA obtained pre- and postmortem from subjects in the ADRC. (4) to facilitate APOE genotyping on participants in the ADRC. (5) to support the assessment of genetically engineered mouse models relevant to Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related disorders, (6) to collaborate with the medical and research community outside of Johns Hopkins by providing assistance with postmortem diagnoses of AD and other types of dementia, and (7) to train basic investigators and clinical neuroscientists in the morphological and diagnostic concepts relevant to AD, to other types of dementias and neurodegenerative disorders.

Public Health Relevance

The Johns Hopkins Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) will address many of the topics important to dementia research, with a particular focus on the understanding the earliest phases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This approach is important if we are ultimately going to be able to diagnose and treat AD as early as possible. The ADRC fosters interactions among scientists who are pursuing this overarching theme.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50AG005146-28
Application #
8440984
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-4)
Project Start
1997-07-15
Project End
2015-03-31
Budget Start
2011-04-01
Budget End
2012-03-31
Support Year
28
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$229,236
Indirect Cost
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Type
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
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