CORE A: ADMINISTRATIVE CORE The goal of the Administrafive Core is to set the overall direction of the center, ensure the optimal utilization of resources and provide a sense of """"""""Centerness"""""""". The Core will provide the infrastructure and environment to enhance excellence in basic science research, clinical and translational research.
Our specific aims are outlined in the RFA and include coordinafing and integrafing activifies among the Cores and projects, promofing interactions with the scientific and lay communities to develop relevant goals for the Center and coordinafing and organizing internal and external advisory committee meefings. The Core will solicit, oversee the review and submission of Pilot Projects to the NIA, and monitor Pilot Project progress. The Core will also provide fiscal accountability and business management expertise to the Center and assure compliance with human subject protecfion, animal welfare, scientific integrity and data and sample sharing The Core will interact with other Centers and the Nafional Alzheimer's Coordinating Center and develop trans-ADC and outside research projects. The Core will build upon the rich opportunifies within UCI to enhance ADRC research including providing Core resources for the development of research on brain aging and AD to UCI investigators. Finally the Core will coordinate with NIA on media coverage and interact with the surrounding lay and professional communifies to communicate the latest research from the Center and field. Overall, the Administrative Core seeks to create a vibrant, innovative research and training environment to understand the basis for the decline of cognifive funcfion with age, the mechanisms that cause the onset of AD and discover treatment to prevent and treat AD.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50AG016573-15
Application #
8668846
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-04-01
Budget End
2015-03-31
Support Year
15
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of California Irvine
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Irvine
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
92697
Kamara, Dennis M; Gangishetti, Umesh; Gearing, Marla et al. (2018) Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Similarity in African-Americans and Caucasians with Alzheimer's Disease. J Alzheimers Dis 62:1815-1826
Kirson, Noam Y; Scott Andrews, J; Desai, Urvi et al. (2018) Patient Characteristics and Outcomes Associated with Receiving an Earlier Versus Later Diagnosis of Probable Alzheimer's Disease. J Alzheimers Dis 61:295-307
Leal, Stephanie L; Yassa, Michael A (2018) Integrating new findings and examining clinical applications of pattern separation. Nat Neurosci 21:163-173
Stark, Shauna M; Reagh, Zachariah M; Yassa, Michael A et al. (2018) What's in a context? Cautions, limitations, and potential paths forward. Neurosci Lett 680:77-87
Kaur, Antarpreet; Edland, Steven D; Peavy, Guerry M (2018) The MoCA-Memory Index Score: An Efficient Alternative to Paragraph Recall for the Detection of Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment. Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord 32:120-124
Weintraub, Sandra; Besser, Lilah; Dodge, Hiroko H et al. (2018) Version 3 of the Alzheimer Disease Centers' Neuropsychological Test Battery in the Uniform Data Set (UDS). Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord 32:10-17
Brenowitz, Willa D; Han, Fang; Kukull, Walter A et al. (2018) Treated hypothyroidism is associated with cerebrovascular disease but not Alzheimer's disease pathology in older adults. Neurobiol Aging 62:64-71
Wilmoth, Kristin; LoBue, Christian; Clem, Matthew A et al. (2018) Consistency of traumatic brain injury reporting in older adults with and without cognitive impairment. Clin Neuropsychol 32:524-529
Gallagher, Damien; Kiss, Alex; Lanctot, Krista L et al. (2018) Toward Prevention of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults With Depression: An Observational Study of Potentially Modifiable Risk Factors. J Clin Psychiatry 80:
Ting, Simon Kang Seng; Foo, Heidi; Chia, Pei Shi et al. (2018) Dyslexic Characteristics of Chinese-Speaking Semantic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia. J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 30:31-37

Showing the most recent 10 out of 518 publications