The Emory Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) coordinates growth and integrates basic research and clinical science activities relevant to Alzheimer's disease and other related neurodegenerative disorders. Our Team consists of a large multi-disciplinary group of faculty and staff committed to collaborations and the success of the ADRC. The ADRC Administrative Core plays the central role in coordinating interactions among the ADRC Cores and Research Projects and other centers and programs to leverage opportunities and achieve its goals. In our initial funding period we have established and documented standard operating procedures for each of the Cores, provided opportunities for regular communications and interactions, secured strong financial underpinnings with additional generous support from the institution and community, facilitated recruitment and development of junior faculty and minorities, and attracted new faculty to the field of AD research at Emory. The following specific aims will be pursued to achieve the Emory ADRC Administrative Core's mission: 1) To actively coordinate, integrate, and plan for all ADRC activities and research interactions and to oversee the progress to ensure optimal utilization, leveraging, and management of resources;2) To solicit, review, develop and implement Pilot and Research Projects;3) To enhance AD research, clinical care, and education by maximizing opportunities for interaction with other ADCs and AD investigators, as well as other local, regional, national, and international institutions, agencies, including NIA, and industries, and timely submission of data sets to the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center;4) To cultivate an environment that promotes the highest standards for ethics in clinical care and research, and compliance with human subjects, animal welfare, fiscal policies, and scientific integrity. Through these aims we will continue building the relationships and connections necessary to advance efforts towards diagnosing and treating patients suffering from AD and other related neurodegnerative diseases.

Public Health Relevance

The state of Georgia's population is aging rapidly and by 2030, one in five Georgians will be over 60. Given that advancing age is a primary risk factor in developing Alzheimer's disease, this population shift will pose a major public health problem in managing the consequences ofthe disease. The proposed work will provide the infrastructure necessary to support the efforts of the Emory ADRC to better understand the causes and hence accelerate improvements in care of individuals with Alzheimer's disease.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50AG025688-09
Application #
8460054
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-4)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-05-01
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
9
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$207,035
Indirect Cost
$79,835
Name
Emory University
Department
Type
DUNS #
066469933
City
Atlanta
State
GA
Country
United States
Zip Code
30322
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