Plan / Example for Process of Selection of Candidates Throughout the time of our SPORE, we have selected candidates for developmental support from the base of talent that exists between young laboratory and clinical investigators throughout the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Several types of individuals have been sought. First, post-doctoral fellows who were receiving training directly in lung cancer research who have shown exceptional potential for such endeavors, and who are committed to academic careers in this arena, were identified. We also sought individuals, again, at the post-doctoral levels, who were training in other disciplines, but who were developing expertise that could foster exceptional translational research in lung cancer. Second, we identified young junior faculty members who had demonstrated potential in translational lung cancer research, and who were dedicated to including such goals in establishing their first faculty positions. In each case, the funds requested constituted the first national funding for these promising investigators. Finally, we have particularly looked for talented young clinicians who could markedly enhance our capacity to move our most promising work to the highest translational phases, especially if given protected time, through the career development funds, to spend extended time with SPORE work. The decision process for identifying, selecting and approving candidates to receive Career Development funds was outlined in the Program Description, but is repeated here for convenience of the reviewers. The PI and/or members of the SPORE steering committee shown inside the triangle in Figure 1, below, identify all of our awardees. Once all have agreed, we seek consultation from one of the advisory mechanisms depicted outside the triangle in Figure 1 and this always includes the Cancer Center Director, who is, in this interim period, the SPORE PI.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50CA058184-18
Application #
8403072
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-GRB-I)
Project Start
Project End
2014-11-30
Budget Start
2012-12-01
Budget End
2013-11-30
Support Year
18
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$95,100
Indirect Cost
$21,122
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Type
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
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