The Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) Phase III is a continuation of a successful SPORE-supported population-based study examining genetic and epidemiologic risk factors and characteristics of breast cancer with a focus on African-American (AA) and premenopausal breast cancer. Studies from the approximately 2000 breast cancer patients participating in CBCS Phases I and II demonstrated that patients with AA race and young age had a high prevalence ofthe poor prognosis Basal-like breast cancer, and conversely a low prevalence ofthe good prognosis Luminal A subtype. Additionally, reevaluafion of traditional risk factors suggested considerable heterogeneity in effects by subtype;unique genetic and lifestyle factor associations have been observed for basal-like breast cancer, sometimes with effects in the opposite direction as expected based on associations with overall breast cancer risk. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the higher incidence and mortality from breast cancer in younger African American women compared to white women is due to a combination of factors, including differences in tumor biology, access to care, and type of treatment received. Furthermore, we hypothesize that continued comprehensive investigation of these factors will identify specific clinical and public health interventions to lower breast cancer mortality. To identify the factors that are associated with each breast cancer subtype, CBCS Phase III was opened in 2008, expanding the previous 24-county catchment area of Phases l-ll to 44 counties across North Carolina, and will accrue an additional 1500 AA women and 1500 non-AA women by 2014. The goal of CBCS III is to identify determinants of disparities in breast cancer clinical outcomes, including biologic, racial, socioeconomic, behavioral factors, and to identify modifiable factors in clinical care (delivery and access) that address the causes of disparities. CBCS Phase III is beyond the scope of a single funding source and is broadly supported by the University and other mechanisms, however there are crucial translational implications of this project. Specifically, SPORE funding for gene expression profiling on the tumors (Aim 1), which will enable evaluation of differences in risk factors distribution by subtype (Aim 2), and will be used for collection of treatment and outcome data to assess survival outcomes (Aim 3). This study will provide a comprehensive picture ofthe biology and epidemiology of breast cancer and breast cancer disparities, from risk to survival.

Public Health Relevance

Examination of factors affecting risk, behavior, and prognosis within and across tumor subtypes, and between AA and non-AA women, will identify determinants of racial disparities in breast cancer risk and outcome.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50CA058223-21
Application #
8723744
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-0)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-09-01
Budget End
2015-08-31
Support Year
21
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$789,003
Indirect Cost
$619,943
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Haddad, Stephen A; Lunetta, Kathryn L et al. (2016) Gene-based analysis of the fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling pathway in relation to breast cancer in African American women: the AMBER consortium. Breast Cancer Res Treat 155:355-63
Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hong, Chi-Chen et al. (2016) Genetic variants in the mTOR pathway and breast cancer risk in African American women. Carcinogenesis 37:49-55
Murphy, Caitlin C; Sandler, Robert S; Sanoff, Hanna K et al. (2016) Decrease in Incidence of Colorectal Cancer Among Individuals 50 Years or Older After Recommendations for Population-based Screening. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol :
Sun, Xuezheng; Nichols, Hazel B; Tse, Chiu-Kit et al. (2016) Association of Parity and Time since Last Birth with Breast Cancer Prognosis by Intrinsic Subtype. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 25:60-7
Li, Hui; Zhu, Yitan; Burnside, Elizabeth S et al. (2016) Quantitative MRI radiomics in the prediction of molecular classifications of breast cancer subtypes in the TCGA/TCIA data set. NPJ Breast Cancer 2:
Nichols, Hazel B; Bowles, Erin J A; Islam, Jessica et al. (2016) Tamoxifen Initiation After Ductal Carcinoma In Situ. Oncologist 21:134-40
He, Zhijian; Wan, Xiaomeng; Schulz, Anita et al. (2016) A high capacity polymeric micelle of paclitaxel: Implication of high dose drug therapy to safety and in vivo anti-cancer activity. Biomaterials 101:296-309
Johnson, Amy R; Qin, Yuanyuan; Cozzo, Alyssa J et al. (2016) Metabolic reprogramming through fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1) regulates macrophage inflammatory potential and adipose inflammation. Mol Metab 5:506-26
Roberts, Megan C; Weinberger, Morris; Dusetzina, Stacie B et al. (2016) Racial Variation in the Uptake of Oncotype DX Testing for Early-Stage Breast Cancer. J Clin Oncol 34:130-8
Hertz, Daniel L; Deal, Allison; Ibrahim, Joseph G et al. (2016) Tamoxifen Dose Escalation in Patients With Diminished CYP2D6 Activity Normalizes Endoxifen Concentrations Without Increasing Toxicity. Oncologist 21:795-803

Showing the most recent 10 out of 500 publications