The Program has been a major focus of the SPORE because it provides for a continuous flow of innovative ideas and activity to stimulate investigation in the context of SPORE translational research. The Developmental Research Program provides a means to respond to new opportunities, and is designed to encourage and facilitate new research efforts. The Program takes advantage of the broad expertise of researchers at The Johns Hopkins University and of external investigators by providing funds for pilot projects with potential for development into full-fledged translational research avenues, collaborations, and new methodologies for integration into other Research Projects. In most prior years, the Cancer Center has augmented the funding provided to each of our pilot project recipients by approximately 50% per award (on average). In the past two years, the formation of a GI Cancer program within the Oncology Center has also provided support for additional basic and clinical pilot projects that are not intended to be as translational as the goals of the SPORE Developmental Projects. Within this year, we also have gained a commitment for an additional two pancreatic cancer pilot projects to be funded by institutional sources each year. These resources, and funding pressures from a reduced overall budget for the proposed SPORE funding period, have allowed us to shift some of the financial sources from the SPORE to the institution, as reflected in the newly proposed Developmental Research Budget.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50CA062924-20
Application #
8559523
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-M)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
20
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$121,781
Indirect Cost
$46,430
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Type
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
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