The genesis of colorectal and pancreatic cancer involves the interaction of environmental and heritable causes. Key to discoveries in diagnosis and treatment of these malignancies is the understanding of these factors by investigation of well- characterized and available patient data and specimens. The goal of CORE 3 is to provided SPORE and other investigators with these materials to support the research of familial, environmental and molecular genetic factors in both colorectal and pancreatic cancer. With this regard, a registry and clinical study of patients with hereditary colorectal cancer and polyposis syndromes were founded at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1973. In 1982, the Bowel Tumor Working Group was formed to study the pathobiology and molecular genetics of colorectal tumors. In 1991 the CORE 3 was formed. The CORE is maintained in computerized Access and Progeny data bases and includes: 1) families with a history of familial aggregation of colorectal cancer, early onset colorectal cancer and polyposis syndromes and 2) family histories and food frequency questionnaires on patients evaluated for colorectal neoplasm. The CORE was expanded in 1996 to include similar data on pancreatic cancer patients.
The specific aims of CORE 3 are: 1. To collect family history, medical history, pathological records, environmental/exposure data and dietary date from at risk and affected individuals with colorectal and pancreatic neoplasm and associated syndromes. 2. To procure specimens including blood and stool in at risk and affected individuals with colorectal and pancreatic neoplasm and associated syndromes.

Public Health Relevance

The importance of the knowledge gained by the data accumulated by this CORE is significant and multifactorial. Benefits from this knowledge might include risk markers necessary for the initiation of preventive surveillance strategies, diagnostic markers essential to the appropriate medical and surgical treatment of these tumors, and therapeutic targets needed for the development of medical therapies.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50CA062924-21
Application #
8727982
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-09-01
Budget End
2015-08-31
Support Year
21
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
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