The Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core (Biostats Core) provides collaborative statistical and informatics support to the UI/MC SPORE projects, developmental projects, and other cores. The comprehensive nature ofthe Core, which will have activities at both lowa and Maye, assures each SPORE investigator access to expertise that includes development of study designs and analysis plans, state of the art data analysis and interpretation, data management resources, and abstract and manuscript preparation. The Core builds upon the innovative and time-tested procedures and systems developed by Mayo Clinic, one ofthe largest statistical groups in the country whose members have collaborated on more than 8,000 clinical and basic science research studies since 1966, as well as the University of lowa Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Biostatistics Department, and Coordinated Laboratory fer Computational Genomics. Design and analysis support will be provided across a range of fields, including epidemiological studies, basic sciences including translational and immunologic correlative studies, gene microarray, gene and mutation discovery, expression analysis and genomics, and computational biology. The Core developed the statistical plans for past studies initiated in the SPORE, and has been actively involved in the preparation of statistical plans for the four projects in this application. Support is also provided for the management and integration ef existing and newly collected data through consistent and compatible data handling. Areas of support include database development, data form development and processing, data collection and entry, data archiving, quality control, and management of information relating to gene mutation identification and genotyping data for disease linkage experiments. In the past funding periods, the Cere established the infrastructure te link lymphoma clinical and research databases between Ul and MC. This system is fully functional and allows web-based clinical registration and data entry from both sites into a common database. Furthermore, the Core has and will continue to provide data management for all studies, to monitor adverse events In conjunction with the Clinical Research Core, and to prepare data summaries for manuscript preparation. In summary, strengths of the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core are our collaboration with each of the projects and cores, the ability to utilize the established centralized research database as well as the operational and statistical infrastructure already in place in the SPORE, and the breadth of expertise provided by Biostatistics and Bioinformatics personnel.

Public Health Relevance

Robust Biostatistics and Bioinfonnatics is critical if the UI/MC SPORE is going to conduct effective translational lymphoma research. The Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core provides this expertise though full collaboration of Biostatisticians and Bioinformaticists in all SPORE research projects.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50CA097274-13
Application #
8689951
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
13
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Iowa
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Iowa City
State
IA
Country
United States
Zip Code
52242
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